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Full text of "Pilgrim"

np 



Pifqrim 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pilgrim1939plym 



THE PILGRIM 

Volume XVIII Plymouth, Mass., June, 1939 No. 1 

Published this year as a Senior Year Book 

1938 THE PILGRIM STAFF 1939 

Editor-in-Chief ----------------- Nahum Morse 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief Richard Tubbs 

Literary Editor ------ ..____ Betty Coleman 

Junior Literary Editor -------------- Lewis Morton 

Sophomore Literary Editor ------------ Dorothy Morton 

Business Manager -- _-__._ Brooks Barnes 

Assistant Business Manager _____ Alphonse Gambini 

Boys' Athletics ------ Alton Zaniboni 

Girls' Athletics --------------- Constance Addyman 

Art -------------------- Linda Longinotti 

Assistant Art ----------------- Edgar Mongan 

Exchange Editor ___________ Paul Douglas 

Assistant Exchange Editor DORRIS Bliss 

French and Italian Editor ------------ Eleanor Fascioli 

Latin Editor ------------------- Joan Beever 

Alumni Editor ----------------- Emily McEwen 

Assistant Alumni Editor - ____ Lydia Brewster 

Joke Editor --- --------- Robert Briggs 

Assistant Joke Editor --------------- Walter Corrow 

School News Editor - _______ Madeline Baker 

Assistant School News Editor ------- ___ Helen Hamilton 

Senior Features ------------ J Catherine Leonardi 

I Shirley Goldsmith 

Senior Poems ------------------ T/ta Murphy 

Candid Camera --- ______ Francis Brown 

Assistant Candid Camera ------------ Virginia Weston 

Clubs ----- -_--_- Lois Chandler 

Typist _----____ Rita Riedel 

E 

'SOUTHEASTERN* 




Table of Contents 



COMMENCEMENT PAGE 

To the Faculty - _ _ _ 3 

Yesterday — In Fact ------------- 7 

To-day — In Fun -- ____.__8 

To-morrow — In Fancy - - - - - - - -• - - -10 

With Malice Toward None _ . _ _ _ 14 

Dotty Biographies ________ 27 

Class Song ---------- 27 

Class Statistics -------------- 28 

They Ain't What They Used To Be --------- 30 

Principal's Column -_------_-___ 31 

Tribute to Our Best Citizen ----------- 32 

What Would Happen - - 32 

Class Superlatives ------ -------32 

Songs Old and New ------------- 33 

Current Choices by Our Faculty ----------34 

Eccentricities of Famous (?) Persons of The Class of '39 - - - - 35 

Class Poem ------ ___36 

LITERATURE 

The Art Of Living - 37 

Educate The Public ------------- 37 

Junior Poetry Page ------ -38 

Candidly Yours - - - 39 

A Student's Soliloquy ------------40 

Leter Uv A Reel Amerikun 40 

Two Poems -------- ------- 42 

The Return - - - - - 43 

Suggestion -- ---43 

Sophomore Poetry Page ----- _______ 44 

ACTIVITIES 

The Talk Of The School - - _____ 45 

EXCHANGES --------- _______ 47 

CANDID CAMERA ------- _______ 48 

EXCERPTS FROM THE DIARY OF A P. H. S. STUDENT ----- 49 

JOKES ---------- ------- 50 

ATHLETICS - - ------- 51 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES ------ ------- 55 

CLUB NEWS ---------------- 61 

JOKES ----------------- 68 

AUTOGRAPHS - - 72 



THE PILGRIM 



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sO^ZCiJutz* 



MR. WAYNE SHIPMAN 

Happiness was born a twin. — Byron 



MR. RICHARD SMILEY 

For where these voices end there is peace — Tennyson 



MISS MARGIE WILBER 

To know her is to love her. — Rogers 




THE PILGRIM 



MISS IRIS ALBERTINI 

You taught me language, and my 
profit in it. 

Shakespeare 



MISS E. DORIS CAREY 



Ambition has no rest. 



Bulwer-Tytton 



MR. CHARLES BAGNALL 

A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the wisest men. 

Anonymous 



MISS BARBARA COOMBS 

The secretary by nature. 

Walton 



MISS VIOLA BOUCHER 

We may live without friends; we 
may live without books; 

But civilized man cannot live with- 
out cooks. 

Owen Meredith 



MR. AUSTIN CRAMER 

His very foot has music in it 
As he comes up the stairs. 

Mickle 



MISS CHARLOTTE BROWN 

Far from our eyes the Enchanting 

object set, 
Advantage by the friendly Distance 

get. 

Alexis 



MISS VIRGINIA DOWLING 

A woman of sovereign parts she is 

esteemed; 
Well fitted in art. 

Shakespeare 






THE PILGRIM 




MR. GILBERT GARLAND 

For you and I are past our dancing 
days. 

Shakespeare 



MISS JEANNETTE JACQUES 

True humor issues not in laughter, 
but in still smiles, which lie far 
deeper. 

Carlyle 



MRS. BEATRICE GARVIN 

Praise like gold and diamonds 

owes its values only to its scarcity. 

Samuel Johnson 



MISS HELEN JOHNSON 

They that govern the most make 
the least noise. 

John Selden 



MISS LOUISE HUMPHREY 

Those about her 

From her shall learn the perfect 
ways of honor. 

Shakespeare 



MISS LYDIA JUDD 

Nothing is impossible to a wil- 
ling heart. 

Heywood 



MISS BEATRICE HUNT 

As sweet and musical as bright 
Apollo's lute. 

Shakespeare 



MISS ELIZABETH KELLY 

Never an idle moment, but 
thrifty and thoughtful of others. 

Longfellow 







THE PILGRIM 




MR. HENRY KNOWLTON 

You are my guide, philosopher, 
and friend. 

Pope 



MR. JOHN PACKARD 

Men are only boys grown tall; 
Hearts don't change much after all. 
Anonymous 





MISS KATHERINE LANG 

Penny saved is a penny got. 

Henry Fielding 



MISS AMY RAFTER 

The dignity of history! 

Viscount Bolingbroke 



MISS NELLIE LOCKLIN 

Trees do not delight all persons. 

Virgil 



MRS. MIRIAM RAYMOND 

I find you want me to furnish you 
with argument and intellect too. 

Goldsmith 



MR. EDGAR MONGAN 

Some books are to be tasted, 
others to be swallowed, and some 
few to be chewed and digested. 

Bacon 



MR. MARIO ROMANO 

A new broom sweeps clean. 

Heywood 




THE PILGRIM 



Class of 1939 

of 

Plymouth High School 

OFFICERS 

President - - Richard Holmes Tubbs 

Vice-President - George William Banker, Jr. 

Secretary - - - Ita Marion Murphy 

Treasurer ----------- Frances Townsend Brown 

CLASS COLORS CLASS MOTTO 

Blue, white and gold Scientia potestas est. 

CLASS FLOWER 
Yellow rose and delphinium 

YESTERDAY 

— In Fact 



J-JOW envious I am of that old skinflint, 
Scrooge, who was so fortunate 
(even though he did not realize it at 
the time) as to be visited by the Spirit 
of Christmas Past and to be carried 
back to the days of his youth ! Should I, 
too, be given an opportunity to look 
backwards, which of my high school 
days would I choose to live again? It 
was of this that I was thinking as I lay 
in bed a few days previous to gradua- 
tion. Startled by the appearance of an 
elderly figure at my bedside, I quickly 
questioned, "Who are you?" 

With one hand extended toward me 
she said, "I am the Ghost of Four Years 
Past. Come, we have many things to see 
tonight." 

A moment later my companion led me 
into the old high school building. Into 
the auditorium we ventured, to witness 
events long since memories in my mind. 
We held a class meeting with our Presi- 
dent, Edward Bradford, and our Vice- 
President, Thomas Prentice, officiating. 

Next, a play entitled "Good English" 
was presented under the direction of 
Miss Andrews, our English teacher. 
Edward Bradford, Katherine Baratta, 
and Rose Bernardo were among those in 
the cast, and, as I glanced around, I 
noticed several upperclassmen who had 
thought the presentation important 
enough to stay after school to see. 

The ghost made a quick gesture with 
her uolifted palm, and we were trans- 
oorted to Memorial Hall. The affair was 
my Freshman Dance which was already 
in full swing and giving promise of be- 



coming a brilliant social affair. Although 
invitations were required, we slipped 
past fellow classmates unnoticed. It was 
not until then that I realized we were 
invisible. 

Since time meant nothing to us, we 
stayed to see the fi rst High School Cir- 
cus. It goes wi; 'it saying that the 
freshmen were, perhaps, the proudest 
participants, not only because there was 
a fine response to the dance given by a 
group of freshman girls, but also be- 
cause it was unusual for a freshman to 
be featured as was Thomas Ruggiero in 
his tap dance specialty number. 

The Spirit spoke. "Come, we must 
pass into the next year !" There were 
many other things I had hoped to see, 
but the excursion into my first (and 
last) year in the old high school had 
ended. 

II 

After a thorough inspection of the 
new school with its spacious auditorium, 
gymnasium, and cafeteria, I observed 
that Edward Bradford was again class 
president with Nahum Morse as vice- 
president, Brooks Barnes, secretary; 
and Frances Brown, treasurer. 

A series of assemblies sponsored by 
the S. A. S. was presented in the audi- 
torium where my ever-present guide 
had taken me. A few of the most pleas- 
ing ones were: "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 
Hyde", "Study of Liquid Air", "Cham- 
pion Typist", and "Bruce, the Magi- 
cian." 

Hearing dance music in the gymna- 
sium, I entered and found myself in the 



8 



THE PILGRIM 



midst of a gay throng enjoying our 
Sophomore Hop. Purple balloons, hung 
to represent clusters of grapes, made a 
colorful and unusual decoration and 
elicited many compliments. 

Because we had far to travel yet, I 
was hurriedly drawn into the next 
year's activities without seeing the 
second High School Circus. I knew, 
however, that I was missing excellent 
entertainment, and I was disappointed 
at not having seen the Sopohomore girls 
perform their specialty, "The Irish 

Jig." 

Ill 

The Spirit, calling my attention to the 
class officers, pointed out: 

Nahum Morse — President 
Richard Tubbs — Vice-President 
Charlotte Whiting — Secretary 
Frances Brown — Treasurer 

We did stop, however, in this year to 
see our third successful attempt at a 
school Variety Show, "Carnival 
Capers". At the conclusion of the enter- 
tainment in the auditorium, the cafe- 
teria rang with the shouts and laughter 
of all those attending the "Midway", 
whence they departed to the gymnasium 
to spend the remainder of the evening 
dancing. 

On our return visit to the auditorium 
we witnessed the Junior Class presenta- 
tion of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" with 
an all-junior cast including Shirley 
Goldsmith, John Canducci, George 
Banker, and Harrison Longhi. This 
had been our first real adventure into 
the realm of the fine arts. 

Entering Memorial Hall to witness 
our Junior Promenade, I immediately 
noticed our long-disputed class colors, 
which, needless to say, were not plaid! 
The affair was a distinct success, one of 
those things the Class of 1939 could not 
but look back upon with satisfaction. 
IV 

Our Senior year with its innumerable 
class meetings and important discus- 
sions immediately permitted me to see 
in action the class officers ! 

President — Richard Tubbs 
Vice-President — George Banker 
Secretary — Ita Murphy 
Treasurer — Frances Brown 

Without further ado we were on the 
sidelines watching an excellent exhibi- 
tion of good sportsmanship on the part 
of our 1938 football squad. 

At the sight of many strange boys 
and girls in our corridors, I immediately 
realized that they were guests of the 



Pilgrim Staff, who were entertaining 
the Southeastern League of School 
Papers. Representing our school in a 
"Professor Quiz Program" was Richard 
Tubbs. A physical contest consisting 
chiefly of game skills caused much ex- 
citement, with Plymouth High cheering 
its candidate, Tillie Bussolari. 

In a surprisingly short time we were 
entertained by . Bernard Loring and 
His Casino Orchestra playing for the 
Annual Senior Dance. For the first 
time I noted a frown of disapproval on 
the face of the ghost, who shook her 
head sadly. She, too, realized that this 
affair was not so successful financially 
as it surely could have been. 

A Minstrel Show— "P. H. S.-Cap- 
ades" — in the auditorium provided our 
next entertainment. The excellent har- 
monizing of a thoroughly-disguised 
chorus combined with the endless wit of 
the endmen produced a performance 
worthy of high acclaim. 

"We are at the end of our journey," 
whispered the Ghost of Four Years 
Past, and in an instant she was gone, 
leaving me, like Scrooge, with a 
changed outlook towards the future, 
with this visit as an ever-present re- 
minder of four years spent in Plymouth 
High School. 

Emily McEwen 



TODAY 

— In Fun 
gEFORE the doors close forever on the 
egregious and assiduous Class of 
1939, and of our deeds only a memory 
remains, it is our duty to fulfill a solemn 
rite of bequeathment. And so: — 
Lest auld acquaintance be forgot 
And ne'er be brought to mind, 
We now depart from P. H. S. 
But leave these gifts behind: 
To Mr. Shipman: A fine new derby 
to be worn exclusively at football 
games, in order that it may quell any 
future insurgent desire of his for the 
unusual in headgear. 

Mrs. Raymond: Our fond hope that 
she and her Pilgrim Staff will receive 
the award for the best vear book for 
1939. 

Miss Carey: A chute directly from 
Senior Chorus to room 104 to insure the 
prompt delivery of French III students. 
Mr. Smiley: A large tank of water 
with which to demonstrate the perplexi- 
ties of artificial respiration to his in- 
articulate Sophomores. 

Mr. Mongan : An abundance of con- 
testants for a bigger and better roller- 



THE PILGRIM 



skating contest next year. It may be 
possible that the Athletic Fund will pro- 
vide pneumatic cushions for the un- 
fortunate ones. 

Mrs. Garvin: A box of sharp, sturdy 
tacks for the discouragement of motor- 
ists who persist in making a boulevard 
of the girls' hockey field. 

Mr. Bagnall: Our compliments on 
his choice of cravats, which pleases even 
our fastidious taste. 

Miss Dowling : A truckful of all con- 
ceivable types of drawing supplies, so 
that her art students may do even 
greater things than we've come to ex- 
pect of them. 

Miss Lang: Our thanks for her co- 
operation when the Class of '39 was de- 
bating the question of plaid for our 
class colors. The idea was original, to 
say the least. 

Mr. Garland : A second Robert Wad- 
low for the center spot on next year's 
team. 

Miss Locklin: A detachable snow- 
plow for her car, said appurtenance to 
be affixed immediately when she reaches 
the outskirts of Boston. 

Mr. Knowlton: A barrel of apples 
for his gastronomic delight — and a 
rabbit hound "pour la chasse." 

Mr. Packard : An autogyro to trans- 
port him safely from his domicile in the 
wilderness to a haven outside Room 102. 

Miss Boucher: A requirement that 
all Senior girls take her cooking course, 
so that the Class of '39 may make con- 
tributions of everlasting value to the 
American cuisine. 

Miss Judd: A challenge from her to 
Floyd Gibbons to dictate more rapidly 
than she can transcribe in shorthand, 
the results of said contest to prove be- 
yond a doubt that the pen is mightier 
than the tongue. 

Miss Humphrey: Flexible periscopes 
to be used by certain Seniors who oc- 
cupy front-row seats in the balcony of 
the auditorium. This will allow them to 
focus their optics on the students below 
without violating the sacredness of 
the balcony railing. 

Miss Coombs: A lot of praise for a 
wee lass with a grand smile whose wil- 
lingness to help others, though occupied 
with her own secretarial duties, is most 
gratifying. 

Miss Kelly: A gold-lined, diamond- 
studded peephole in her umbrella to 
minimize the danger of perforating un- 
wary students while she is crossing the 
Training Green. 



Miss Johnson : A class of study hall 
students who always arrive punctually. 

Miss Rafter: Morris, Richelieu, and 
Hamilton controlled the finances of na- 
tions. But our thanks to Miss Rafter for 
suggesting the solution of the even 
more perplexing problem of graduation 
funds by the introduction of the school 
banking system. 

Mr. Cramer: A welcome to New 
England's rocky shores. We sincerely 
hope his stay in Plymouth will be a 
long and pleasant one. 

Miss Wilber: An orchid to her and 
her cooperative Senior Latin students 
for furnishing such fine choices of class 
mottoes. 

Miss Hunt: A special dispensation 
from Providence which would prevent 
her from hearing any of our discords. 

Mr. Romano : A whistle of unique in- 
tensity, such that its clarion call may 
abet his officiating at those hectic South 
Shore basketball games. 

Miss Albertini : A cordial invitation 
to demonstrate to us what we understand 
was her chief avocation while she was a 
Senior in high school 

Miss Jacques: An enconium to her 
and the I. C. C. for bringing to the 
school what it considers one of the finest 
assembly programs of the year. 

Class of 1940 : Our condolences in 
the difficulties you will encounter in 
attempting to maintain the standards 
set by the Class of '39. 

Class of 1941 : A gentle hint, dear 
Juniors to be, that you read our latest 
book, "How To Win Friends and In- 
fluence School Teachers." The informa- 
tion contained therein is the invaluable 
result of twelve years' research. 

Signed, sealed, and blotted in the ex- 
ecutive chambers of Slaphappia by Ima 
Dudd and Yure A. Nother. 

Will someone save the Commonwealth 
of Slaphappia? 

Paul Douglas 
Robert Raymond 




f I 



The editors wish to thank Miss Judd 
and her typists for assistance in the 
preparation of copy for "The Pilgrim." 



10 



THE PILGRIM 



TOMORROW 

— In Fancy 

13 Mayflower Street 
Pilgrim Hollow 
June 15, 1949 

Miss Janie Christie 

Christie's Cure Company 

1414 Broadway 

New York City, New York 

Dear Miss Christie: 

We, Selde M. Wright and Watson A. 
Kname, traveling salesmen par excel- 
lence, are now in Pilgrim Hollow, where 
we stopped to sell your product, 
"Christie's Cure for Corns and Chil- 
blains.'' However, we met so many of 
your old friends here that we decided to 
write you about all we saw. A report 
of our sales will follow later. 

As we stopped at the Bus Terminal, 
Catherine Leonardi, President and Chiei 
Pilot of "Kitty's Kumfy Koach Line," 
shouted, "All out for Pilgrim Hollow !" 
We hurriedly clambered from the bus, 
following Elsie Mullaney and Florence 
Pimental, the other passengers, and 
walked across the street to the Pilgrim 
Hollow Railroad Station. As we en- 
tered, the "Creeping Comet," piloted by 
Wendell Holmes, rushed into the station. 
The "Comet" was three hours, seventeen 
minutes, and thirty-four seconds late, 
as usual, though it comes to Pilgrim 
Hollow but once a week. As soon as it 
stopped, out came four familiar people. 
"Look," said Selde to Watson, "there are 
Mary Zucchelli, Martha Vickery, Ruth 
Schilling, and Olivia Soares." Sure 
enough, out they piled, all sputtering at 
Lester Anderson, the conductor, because 
the train was late. By this time Bob 
Pratt, the baggage master, had a- 
wakened and started sorting the trunks 
for these travelers. Beep ! Beep ! Look 
out! Up the street came tearing Herb 
MacBride's Traipsing Taxi. We leaped 
out of the way as the taxi groaned to a 
halt and disgorged Priscilla Douglass 
and Harriet Childs, who rushed pell- 
mell for the "Creeping Comet." 

"Selde," said Watson, "We'd better 
take this taxi and go up-town." So off 
we flew, sample cases in hand, to hail the 
Traipsing Taxi before it could get under 
way. Once in and started, we had to 
hang on for dear life, fearing a crash at 
any moment, but finally we arrived at 
the City Hall, where we escaped from 
the cab. We entered the Hall, and, see- 



ing the door to the Mayor's office, we 
went in. There we discovered Mayor 
Wilfred Nickerson at his desk, in con- 
ference with John Cadorette of the 
Council, in charge of the Chemical Re- 
search Department of Pilgrim Hollow. 
vv e were greeted warmly, for these were 
old friends. We left the Mayor's office 
and proceeded to look around the Town 
Hail, which also served as a police and 
fire station. First into the police station 
where we found A. Franklin Pierce, 
Chief of Police, asleep at his desk. Hur- 
riedly we tiptoed out to the street, just 
as bergeant John Dupuis, the other 
policeman, drove up in the "Black 
Maria." At this moment the fire alarm 
rang, and, with sirens howling and bells 
clanging, David Bodell, Fire Chief, 
whizzed past closely followed by Charlie 
.Brewster and Edward Bibeau in a 
bright red and yellow fire engine. Fol- 
lowing them, we found the fire at the 
Picazano Pet Palace. The sign at the 
entrance read — "Prize Pomeranians — 
Fullets — Poll Parrots — Pollywogs — 
Perky Penguins — Poodles — Pets-a- 
rienty. " The shop, of course, was that of 
Congetta Provinzano and Jeannette 
Picard. Having met so many old friends 
already, we decided to make a tour of 
Pilgrim Hollow instead of distributing 
our wares. 

Perceiving a garage across the street, 
we went over to rent a car. There we dis- 
covered the show rooms of Motta and 
Otto, dealers in new, used, etc. cars. We 
were pleasantly surprised to see Betsy 
Drew buying a supercharged V24 Otto- 
mobile. Having rented a Motta-car, we 
started on our tour. 

Off we went down Main Street, and at 
the first intersection we spied James 
iodice selling papers and simulta- 
neously making a speech from a soap- 
box, demanding a new deal for news- 
boys. He had only one listener, Alfred 
Francis, who was doing more arguing 
than listening. After some difficulty in 
attracting attention, we managed to 
purchase a "Pilgrim Hollow Gasjette." 
You can imagine our amazement when 
we saw on the front page that famous 
column — "One Nose to the Grindstone" 
— by Robert Raymond. Turning the 
pages of the "Gasjette", we noted that 
none other than Arthur Poirier was the 
owner and publisher. Also there was 
another column, "Girl Counsels Boy" by 
Virginia Vinton, and a comic strip por- 
traying life in the suburbs of Pilgrim 
Hollow, "Mitey Mary Ann", drawn by 
Mary McCosh. Turning back to the first 



THE PILGRIM 



11 



page, we noted an item of interest, — 
Frances Mulcahy, Mary Kelly, and Mary 
Ryan had won prizes at the Irish Boiler- 
makers' Picnic for cooking* the best 
Mulligatawny. Also Phil O'Connell 
and Bill Shea had performed the best 
"Irish Washerwoman" jig. 

"Well, enough of news," remarked 
Watson. "Let's get some gasoline." So 
we drove up to Edward Bradford's 
Gasoline Dispensory and found our- 
selves just behind Gladys Mueller and 
Marilyn Gilman, who were having their 
car serviced by Willy Disalvatore and 
Robert Proctor, the able and ambitious 
attendants. While waiting, we tuned in 
our radio just in time to hear the last 
silver strains of a violin fade away. An 
announcer spoke, — "You have just 
heard Agnes Silva and her silver violin, 
accompanied by Eunice Santos at the 
piano. You have been listening to 
Colonel Robert Po's Amateur Hour, on 
the air at this hour every week. This is 
station WPHS at Pilgrim Hollow. We 
present a special news bulletin. Paul 
Douglas, formerly of Pilgrim Hollow, 
has been appointed Ambassador to 
Scotland. Mr. Douglas is the second 
person in the world to blow Wee Gillis' 
bagpipe. . . The next program is that of 
the "Octette Originale", with the silver- 
tongued master of ceremonies, Bob 
Lowry, at the microphone. Take it, 
Bob." 

Then through our speaker came the 
theme — "The Siberian Desert Song", in- 
troducing the "Octette Originale". 
"Greetings and salutations, good people, 
this is your man Lowry, speaking for 
the "Awful Octette", with the "Dicks" 
Lanman and Silva, clarinet virtuosos, 
Dick Schneider and George Stefani at 
the corny cornets, Harry Longhi and 
Bob Lee, saxaphonists, Parker Barnes, 
slip-horn artist, and "Bud" Henning 
beating the tom-toms. Now everybody 
swings into action as Vern Hogan, that 
golden-voiced caroo-ooner, warbles 
number thirteen on our hit parade, — " 

By this time we were ready to leave 
the gas station, so, shutting off the radio, 
we proceeded along the street once 
more, glancing at the various shops. 
First we saw Canducci's Shoe Hospital, 
with large letters on the window read- 
ing, — "Save your soles, you heels!" In- 
side Margaret Kaiser and Helen Swift 
were having their high heels repaired. 
Next to this place was Lodis' Luxury 
Laundry, owned jointly by Frances and 
Dorothy Lodi. Just coming out were 



Mary Mahler and Jeanette Harty, 
bundles of clothing piled high on their 
arms. Across the street we noticed, 
side by side, Shwom's Super-Service 
Suit Shoppe and Goldsmith's "Gawjus" 
Gowns. In the first we met Warren 
Diegoli, the stockroom superintendent, 
and Margaret Rudolph, who was buying 
some flashy ties, for whom she wouldn't 
say. In the dress shop we found 
Eleanor Fascioli and Alice Govi dis- 
cussing the merits and faults of the 
gowns displayed. Adjoining the dress 
shop was Cy's Versatile Vittle Empo- 
rium, owned by Mario Solieri, and there 
was Iole Marvelli decorating the win- 
dow. Inside Mary Paoletti, Jenny Giori, 
and Clara Pinto were victims of the 
vending of viands. Perhaps with a 
thought of borrowing, we entered the 
Pilgrim Hollow Last National Bank. 
We were greeted by the banker, Presi- 
dent George Banker, and the tellers, Al- 
berta Pederzani and Doris Ruprecht. 
As we left, Antonette Rossetti, Beverly 
Henrion, and Dorothy Scanland entered, 
evidently going in to deposit their 
money. 

As we walked by, we peeked into the 
telephone office, and there saw Dorothy 
Reed and Ceserine Campana busy at the 
switchboards. Adjacent to this office 
was that of the Pilgrim Hollow Knowl- 
edge Company. In Pilgrim Hollow 
knowledge is used in place of electricity, 
since "Scientia Potestas Est". Inside we 
found Katherine Barratta, Edith De- 
Cost, and Harriet Longhi, busy supply- 
ing the power from their store of 
knowledge. Feeling the need of a 
creampuff or two, we invaded the Pil- 
grim Hollow Pastry House, owned by 
Frances Brown. In here Dorothy Cor- 
rea and Elizabeth Hanelt were buying 
some loaves of "Hathaway Bread," 
which was on special sale. On the street 
again we encountered Thomas Fugazzi 
and Robert Hughes, gentleman farmer 
and manager of the Pilgrim Hollow 
Town Team respectively, in earnest 
conference over something we couldn't 
quite hear because John Spurr, the 
streetcleaner, was singing too loudly 
the streetcleaner's national hymn, "You 
Gutter Make Sewer You Keep it Clean." 

The next stop in our tour was "Ber- 
nados' Asylum for Children," operated 
jointly by Dolores and Rose. 

By this time we were nearing the 
beach and waterfront, and before us lay 
Brigida's Fish Market. As we opened 
the door, Angelo Brigida drove past with 
a truckload of perfumed ( ?) fish. Well, 



12 



THE PILGRIM 



what have we here ? No other than Joan 
Beever, serving as clerk and stenogra- 
pher. On her desk this motto startled 
us: "In Cod is our Trust". At the 
counter we spied Doris Chadwick pur- 
chasing some pickled perch and Helen 
Guidetti gazing at the guppies. The 
odiferous atmosphere was much too 
much, however, so we departed from the 
fishery to the clean, fresh air of the 
beach. Out on the sands, amid clam- 
shells and seaweed, we found Linda 
Longinotti, noted artist, painting a por- 
trait of Ita Murphy, who had recently 
won a beauty contest. Near Linda stood 
Constance Addyman, holding the paint. 
Just beyond these three, watching them 
interestedly was Jane Holmes, who, in 
her new Buick, was indulging in her 
hobby, beachcombing. It was near 
lunch time then, so we hastened back 
uptown toward the restaurant. How- 
ever, we couldn't resist looking into the 
offices of Cristani and Darsch, At- 
torneys-at-Law, who were so engrossed 
in an argument that we passed by un- 
noticed. 

Then to lunch in "Govoni's Greasy 
Grill", owned by Mildred Govoni. It was 
so crowded that we had to sit at a table 
with Lawrence Springer and Jesse 
Rezendes. This was no hardship since 
they were former classmates. You can 
imagine our surprise, though, when we 
were waited on by a singing waitress 
whom we recognized as Barbara Brown. 
We shortly finished our luncheon and, 
after a brief exchange of greetings with 
Beverly James, the Chef de Cuisine, we 
paid our bill to Gerald Ziegengeist, the 
cashier, and left to finish our Pilgrim 
Hollow Tour. 

Our first call was at Barbara Cogge- 
shall's "Coiffurerie," where we found 
Edith Adams having her cheveux rouge 
severed, and Laura MacLean demon- 
strating the revived coronet style hair- 
dress to a much interested pair, Eliza- 
beth Baker and Miriam Ketchen. Just 
beyond the beauty parlor was Pascoe's 
"Marble Orchard", where Maralyn 
Pascoe was eulogizing her marble mon- 
uments to Dallas Carpenter, whose pet 
canary had recently died. They gave us 
hearty greetings, but business was par- 
amount so we crossed the street toward 
the Pilgrim Hollow Post Office. En 
route, we passed Gloria Seaver's "Rock- 
ing, Rolling Rink" for roller skating en- 
thusiasts and experts, neither of which 
terms applied to us. Once at the post 
office, it was an easy matter to find 



William Goodwin, the postmaster, who 
was having a bit of difficulty explaining 
why stamps had perforations to Mary 
Carvalho and Doris Caswell. We didn't 
stay long, having decided to indulge in 
higher education by visiting the Pilgrim 
Hollow School. At this institution we 
were warmly greeted by Rita Riedel, 
the efficient office secretary, who showed 
us immediately into the office of the 
principal, Madeline Baker. Principal 
Baker, although glad to see us, was at 
the moment in conference with James 
Caramello, Coach at Pilgrim Hollow 
School, and Tillie Bussolari, Director of 
Girls' Athletics at P. H. S. 

As we left the school, we saw before 
us two very similar buildings. One bore 
the sign: 

Home For Infirm and Disabled Hitch 
Hikers 

Virginia Weston, Elizabeth Coleman, 
Props. 

and in the windows we saw Edward 
Rossi, Richard Strassel, and John 
Torres, each with bandaged thumbs. In 
the other building, according to the 
sign, a sick pet would be well cared for 
by Ruth Holtz, R. N. C. D. 

At this point we came upon the Pil- 
grim Hollow Library. Upon entering, 
we immediately discovered more old 
friends. Seated behind the librarian's 
desk was Phyllis Reinhardt, at a table 
sat Ella Vitti, Poetess Laureate of Pil- 
grim Hollow, deep in thought, perhaps 
searching for inspiration. In a corner 
Emily McEwen sat reading 0. Henry's 
basketball stories. Before leaving, we 
made certain that we were in possession 
of the week's best seller, "Goodbye to 
the Dickey-bird" by Christine Hogan. 
Just as we left, Emily recommended that 
we go over to the race track and watch 
another former classmate making a 
trial spin. So off we went to the track, 
as directed. We were not surprised 
to find that the "Heagan Haste Hoop", 
as the speedway was called, was owned 
by Donald Heath and John Hogan, 
since these two red-heads had been 
somewhat "fast" during their school 
days. But we were almost confounded 
to find that the "Dirt-track Demon" 
making the trial runs was Charlotte 
Whiting and that her mechanic was 
Virginia Young. But then, we were 
reminded that Charlotte was an unusual 
driver even in the days when she at- 
tended Plymouth High School. Now we 
greeted Belmira Ferreira, who was also 
watching the scene at the racetrack, 



THE PILGRIM 



13 



and then started again toward the 
"Greasy Grill". Our sumptuous repast 
completed, we felt the desire to attend 
the theatre. 

Close to the restaurant we discovered 
the "Pilgrimount". Quick to catch our 
eyes was this notice flashing across the 
marquee : 

Brooks Barnes in 
"Wife of the Thin Man" 
This promised to be worthwhile enter- 
tainment, so, purchasing tickets, we en- 
tered. Almost immediately we recog- 
nized the manager as Joe Farina, who, 
we recall, was formerly an usher, but 
who since his high school days must 
have worked his way to the top. He 
directed that Tommy Ruggiero, the 
tap-dancing usher, show us to our seats, 
and we settled back to enjoy the per- 
formance. After the main picture an ex- 
cellent stage show was presented, in- 
cluding a "jitterbug" contest, in which 
Julia Pina and Mary Fernandes, the 
"Trucking Twins", competed with the 
"Blazing Blond Ballerina", Barbara 
Rogers. This act was followed by those 
two "Dark Horses", Thomas (Snowball) 
Prentice, and Gilbert (Zip) Freeman. 
As a fitting climax to a splendid show, 
Claire Ottino performed a difficult ballet 
dance. 

Thence to the "Hotel Charmonde", 
owned and operated by Rosamonde 
Grant and Charlotte Raymond. Here we 
were shown to our rooms by the combi- 
nation doorman — bellhop — elevator 
ODerator, David Furtado. We had a 
very comfortable night's rest, and this 
moraine: (all the foregoing incidents 
happened yesterday) our time has been 
used in writing to vou these few lines 
which are intended to recall to your 
mind memories of your high school 
days. We hone you have enjoyed the ac- 
counts of your friends' activities. We 
certainlv had a nleasant day with them 
again after all these years. 

We have, quite incidentally, secured 
several orders for "Christie's Cure for 
Corns and Chilblains". A full sales re- 
port will follow tomorrow. 

Very truly yours, 
Selde M. Wright 
Watson A. Kname 
Sales Directors 
Christie's Cure Company 
Division of Corns and ChilblainvS 

Nahum Morse '39 
Richard Tubbs '39 



THE MOUNTAIN OF LIFE 

We pause to rest against a giant tree; 
We near the top, our hard climb not yet 

done; 
Yet, gazing back at years through which 

we've come, 
We wonder that we're here, so far within 
Life's somber forest stretching out below. 

Down there 'tis dark — as dark as ignorance; 
And scarce a light-beam penetrates the 

gloom; 
And yet from there we started to ascend 
Making our way along life's tangled trails, 
Unmindful of the dangers lurking near. 

We mean to get there, far above this 

threatening realm 
Of choking darkness fraught with hidden 

fears, 
For here 'tis dark, yet higher up we know 
A light is shining bright, revealing all 
That merely may be dreamed of down below. 

At last we have attained this ledge, where 
now 

We stand and look out far beyond the for- 
est black, 

And gaze on wonders far beyond our 
dreams, 

Vast, jagged mountains, obstacles to be 

Surmounted yet by our aggressiveness. 

Still ne'er could we have reached this peak 
If others had not toiled this way before. 
The ladders were all made and placed for us, 
And we but had to climb the slippery rungs 
Of predecessors' well-constructed ramps. 

And now, again we start — in ignorance; 
And follow in the steps of those before; 
But many stens we needs must take alone, 
And hig-her we must go for higher gain! 
Then, when we reach the top, the world is 
ours! 

Richard Tubbs 



THE BOOK OF LIFE 

A finger poised above the Book of Life, 
A fresh leaf, on which each one must write 
The record of his davs, from birth to death. 
We guide the pen's inevitable flight. 

Our glorious achievements are etched in 
gold; 

A shining testimony of our ability 

To overcome each obstacle in sight 

With dauntless courage and strength of 

will. 

Would that the page might never become 
soiled 

R " anv shameful act to bring disgrace; 

^or good and bad alike must be inscribed. 

Nor can we add, nor any deed erase. 

Endlessly the pen moves o'er the parchment. 
Ea<-h dav a victory gained, some evil 
snurned. 

Our destinv lies within our hands alone; 
We must keep achieving — ere the page be 
turned. 

Ita Murphy 



fll| Haltr? Qfatuarb 5fan? 



EDITH ADAMS 

As silently as 
Night time falls 
You do your work 
Within our halls 



CONSTANCE ADDYMAN 

Like the little quintuplets 
She'd be really unique 
If for each new pair of socks 
She sprouted two more feet. 



LESTER ANDERSON 

Twelve o'clock and all is well 
For everyone but Lester, 
He'll break the record — or 

his leg, 
Or we are no Nestor. 



ELIZABETH BAKER 

Her temper's roused, 
Her face grows red — 
For, "Hi, there, Liz," 
Someone just said. 



MADELINE BAKER 

A most attractive Pilgrim 

maid 
Upon the hillside stood, 
"Indians, Indians!" she cried 
As loudly as she could. 



GEORGE BANKER 

Georgie went a-bowling 

To teach Her how to play; 

But when she'd finished scor- 
ing, 

He'd learned boasting didn't 
pay. 




KATHERINE BARATTA 

In case you should think her 
Sedate and rather shy, 
Just rub her the wrong way 
And watch the fur fly. 



BROOKS BARNES 

She's a little inclined 
To be faintly sarcastic: 
Incur not her anger, 
Her friendship's elastic. 



PARKER BARNES 

We hope you know the story 
Of the tortoise and the hare, 
For to the moral of it 
You should give a care. 



JOAN BEEVER 

Fishy, fishy in the sea, 
Peter catch him just for me- 
Peter fry him in a pan, 
Peter, Peter, what a man! 



DOLORES BERNARDO 

Gentle of speech 
Quiet of mien 
With as friendly a smile 
As ever we've seen. 



ROSE BERNARDO 

Never trouble trouble 

Till trouble troubles you — 

And since you're nicknamed 

Trouble, 
From that we'll take our cue. 



THE PILGRIM 



15 



EDWARD BIBEAU 

Every Saturday at two 
Edward keeps a rendezvous, 
Ask him gently where he's 

bound 
As surely as that hour comes 

'round. 



DAVID BODELL 

So little he cares 
What the headlines shout 
That he needed six months 
To knock News Tests out. 



EDWARD BRADFORD 

A black duck winging 

through the mist — 
Oh, no! It's on the sand. 
At last he's proved his 

marksmanship — 
Today he is a man! 



CHARLES BREWSTER 

You should save your pennies 
And buy a good dummy, 
Like Bergen in Hollywood 
You'd make real money. 



ANGELO BRIGIDA 

If you'd hear the wild waves 

roar 
And for that purpose pace 

the shore, 
Their brave symphoy will be 
Muted by his Model T. 



BARBARA BROWN 

Wood you tell us who he is 
With whom you constantly 

appear? 
Wood you tell us — 'cause, gee 

whiz! 
You'll be a Mrs. soon, we 

hear! 




FRANCES BROWN 

Our fair Frances "hath a 

way" 
All her very own, 
Whate'er for her the future 

holds 
She'll never walk alone. 



TILLIE BUSSOLARI 

She knows just how to make 

a basket, 
She knows her hockey 

through and through: 
We wonder now if Bobby's 

taught her 
How to play the fiddle, too. 



JOHN CADORETTE 

Since we rightly call you 

"Prof," 
And never at your knowledge 

scoff, 
Our best hat we're willing to 

bet 
That you'll be absent-minded 

yet. 



CESERINE CAMPANA 

There is no connection, 
We admit our defection: 
But what is the harm 
If your name suggests balm ? 



JOHN CANDUCCI 

We fear he has it in him 
To do a good strip-tease, 
For when to gym he's going, 
We're not quite at our ease. 



JAMES CARAMELLO 

He made a play for the lady's 
heart, 

He aimed for success from 
the very start, 

He called the signal — half- 
past eight, 

He made a goal, he got a 
date. 



16 



THE PILGRIM 



DALLAS CARPENTER 

We've noticed how you jitter- 
bug 

Though many don't approve, 

Would you kindly show us 
how 

To get "into the groove"? 



MARY CARVALHO 

There are dates to be eaten, 
There are dates to be kept — 
But it's the kind in history 
At which she's most adept. 



DORIS CASWELL 

Ranting and raving 
She finds absurd, 
Significant is it 
When she says a word. 



DORIS CHADWICK 

Kingston boys attract you 
Though they're seldom true, 
If you'll stay at home, Dot, 
Our boys won't make you 
blue. 



HARRIET CHILDS 

A knitting virtuoso 

With needles of great size, 

She knits her socks and 

sweaters 
Right before our eyes. 



JANIE CHRISTIE 

If you'd glimpse some pen- 
manship 
That is bold and free, 
Janie is the senior 
You will have to see. 




BARBARA COGGESHALL 

When Barbie goes out riding, 
She always has to stop 
To buy a chocolate ice cream 
With "Jimmies" on the top. 



ELIZABETH COLEMAN 

Sh° loves Farina for break- 
fast, 

She'd love to have Curley 
hair, 

She'd love to ride in a Frank- 
lin, 

But for which love does she 
care ? 



DOROTHY CORREA 

Your very name arouses 
A mean desire to pun, 
But we fought with it cour- 
ageously 
And finally we won. 



ALBERT CRISTANI 

Most of the time 
He's mild enough: 
it's only in football 
He gets tough. 



ALFRED DARSCH 

Grown men, we've heard, 
Are boys at heart: 
To prove that true 
You'll do your part. 



EDITH DeCOST 

"Oh, girls, do you like my 

coiffure?" 
"Why, Edith, most certainly, 

sure! 
This one is new, 
Most becoming to you, 
Each one has so much al- 
lure ! " 



THE PILGRIM 



17 



WARREN DIEGOLI 

He's the proud possessor 
Of a motor car, 
Now we're fairly certain 
He will travel far. 



WILLIAM DISALVATORE 

We raise our eyes respect- 
fully 
When we pass him in the 

hall- 
It's a matter of necessity 
Because he is so tall. 



PAUL DOUGLAS 

There's no rhyme or reason 

to it, 
It won't make sense at all — 
Now when we hear "Loch 

Lomond" 
Why should we think of 

Paul? 



PRISCILLA DOUGLASS 

Blushing is a womanly art 
That girls today don't know? 
Priscilla is the living proof 
That this just isn't so. 



BETSY DREW 

"There's tricks to all games," 

smiles Betsy, 
"And I have learned my 

share! 
Throwing darts or breaking 

hearts, 
My score is better than fair." 



JOHN DUPUIS 

Some men seek the mountain 
peak, 

Crave romance near or far, 

But not for him such pleas- 
ures — 

His first love is his car. 




JOSEPH FARINA 

Since he sets a rule at 
naught, 

Says a necktie makes him 
hot 

In December — 

We must show no great sur- 
prise 

If he melts before our eyes 
At graduation. 



ELEANOR FASCIOLI 

That you were a beautiful 

baby 
No sane man could doubt — 
He had only to see a bulletin 

board 
In March, to find this out. 



MARY FERNANDES 

Her skillful hands 
And willing heart 
Are ever ready 
To do their part. 



BELMIRA FERREIRA 

Silva and Lanman can't de- 
cide 

Which swing band is best, 

But Bella is not torn by 
doubt: 

Her Joe's leads all the rest. 



ALFRED FRANCIS 

If steadiness of purpose 
Is of target practice born, 
He will get all bulls-eyes 
As the years roll on. 



GILBERT FREEMAN 

A boy as gay as you are 
Might well burst into song: 
And when you tried it in our 

show, 
We clapped you loud and 

long. 



18 



THE PILGRIM 



THOMAS FUGAZZI 

He won't depart for English 

IV 
But lingers idly at the door 
Until he's left a fond caress 
Upon a thing you'd never 

guess — 

The bubbler! 



DAVID FURTADO 

Please handle very carefully 
Or the future won't be bright, 
In basketball and football 
He's a stick of dynamite. 



MARILYN GILMAN 

It really doesn't matter 
Whether it's Gable or Greene, 
At every change of pictures 
Marilyn can be seen. 



JENNIE GIORI 

Though the battle rages 
Between up-do and long bob, 
She refuses to be swayed 
By the fickleness of the mob. 



SHIRLEY GOLDSMITH 

Gold in her name 
Gold in her hair 
Gold in her heart — 
She has gold to spare. 



WILLIAM GOODWIN 

They'd call him "Wrong Way 

Goodwin" 
If his longing should come 

true, 
To fly like Douglas Corrigan 
Is what he wants to do. 




ALICE GOVI 

She rushes madly to the gym, 
Her young heart aglow — 
You don't believe we speak 

the truth? 
How, then, does she go? 



MILDRED GOVONI 

Mildred's where the food is, 
She doesn't have to buy it — 
And this we find ironical, 
For Millie's on a diet. 



ROSEMONDE GRANT 

We "grant" that this young 

lady 
A farmerette will be — 
And, if there is a farmer, 
Would his initials be T. P.? 



HELEN GUIDETTI 

We gaze at her in mild sum- 

mise, 
Unbelief is in our eyes — 
For she looks the same as 

when 
Her years on earth scarce 

numbered ten. 



ELIZABETH HANELT 

"You may not think so now, 
But the day will come: 
French is the finest subject 
In our curriculum." 

Signed— E. H. 



JEANETTE HARTY 

Take a good look 
At our Siamese twins, 
She's as lost without Mary 
As a fish without fins. 



THE PILGRIM 



19 



DONALD HEATH 

Red's friends are surely 

staunch and brave 
To penetrate the glare 
Which fills the danger signal 
That he proudly calls — ! his 

hair. 



PHILLIP HENNING 

You're "Two Sleepy People" 

all in one, 
But not too sleepy to have 

your fun, 
In school you plan to get 

your rest — 
When evening comes, you're 

at your best. 



BEVERLY HENRION 

She's taught each lovely au- 
burn lock 

Never from its place to stray, 

And not a strand dares wan- 
der 

From the straight and narrow 
way. 



CHRISTINE HOGAN 

Two little words 
Simple to recite: 
But it takes her hours 
To say "Good Night." 



JOHN HOGAN 

Be it known that he will 

stalk us 
To our editorial lair 
If we even dare to mention 
Such a thing as hair. 



VERNON HOGAN 

Croon, croon, Hogey boy, 
'Cause you sure know how: 
Sing, sing, music king — 
Then make a regal bow. 




JANE HOLMES 

When she decides in which 
car she'll ride, 

We think it's lots she must 
draw: 

When we asked her to con- 
firm this, 

She simply said, "Oh, 
Pshaw!" 



WENDELL HOLMES 

Keep at it, Huck, keep at it! 
Dancing is your forte: 
It's only jealous Romeos 
Who dare suggest it's not. 



RUTH HOLTZ 

Each second period study 

As sure as the tick of the 
clock, 

As sure as we're sure of any- 
thing — 

We're sure she'll want to 
talk. 



ROBERT HUGHES 

If in Plymouth High School 
For a husband you are look- 
ing, 
Bob is just the man for you — 
He delights in cooking. 



JAMES IODICE 

A doodler scribbles aim- 
lessly — 

But it shows what's on his 
mind: 

If you inspect Jim's papers, 

TINA you will find. 



BEVERLY JAMES 

Don't jump to conclusions, 

we warn you — 
Beverly may be his name, 
But he's not Fauntleroyish, 
For he'll beat you at any 

game. 



20 



THE PILGRIM 



MARGARET KAISER 

She has no interest in fish or 

fowl, 
Nor in steeplechasing at 

Aintree — 
The proper study of mankind 

is man: 
Or rather, one species from 

Braintree. 



MARY KELLY 

When Irish eyes are smilin' 
Sure and you're heart she'll 

win, 
For it's the spirit of the Irish 
Croppin' up agin. 



MIRIAM KETCHEN 

You seem to have some diffi- 
culty 

In making up your mind — 

You'd better graduate with 
us, 

No better class you'll find. 



RICHARD LANMAN 

He enjoys an argument, 
He takes the "other side" — 
No matter what the verdict, 
By it he'll not abide. 



ROBERT LEE 

We hear a shriek and then a 

squeak, 
A moan and then a groan — 
That's music manufactured 
By Bobby's saxaphone. 



CATHERINE LEONARDI 

She may not know baseball 
As well as she ought, 
But she gives to one player 
Her moral support. 




DOROTHY LODI 

"I Have Eyes To See With" 
Is a current ditty — 
But subtler uses a girl knows 
When those eyes are pretty. 



FRANCES LODI 

Singing is a joy to her — 
And, if you ask for it, 
She'll gladly entertain you 
With an operatic hit. 



HARRIET and 
HARRISON LONGHI 

Since your first cries rent the 

air, 
Your mother's had to face 

the fact 
Of two of this and two of 

that: 
But for us the prospect's 

bright 
For one less poem we shall 

write — 
Class twins must share! 



LINDA LONGINOTTI 

She's got it! she's got it! 
No! not her yellow basket. 
She got the point to our joke 
The minute that we asked it. 



ROBERT LOWRY 

Chic may describe 
A high school miss, 
But for one Robert Lowry 
You spell it like this: 
SHEIK 



THE PILGRIM 



21 



HERBERT MACBRIDE 

Herbie says his memory's 

bad, 
His teachers to deceive — 
He remembers what he wants 

to, 
We've reason to believe. 



LAURA MacLEAN 

Laura wears a royal crown 

Upon her lovely head: 

It's not wrought of yellow 
gold, 

But of gleaming braids in- 
stead. 





■ :■ 



MARY MAHLER 

She never has been guilty 
Of talking out of turn, 
To anyone it's obvious 
She comes to school to learn. 



MARY McCOSH 

If you by any chance some 

day 
Should Manomet-ward decide 

to stray, 
We're positive that you will 

meet 
Une fille qui n'est pas trop 

petite. 



EMILY McEWEN 

She eats O'Henry candy, 
She reads O'Henry stories: 
In fact, her greatest joy in 

life 

Is singing Henry's glories. 



IOLE MARVELLI 

Iole's interest lies in art, 
She hopes to design clothes: 
Iole's interest lies in "Art"— 
As everybody knows. 




NAHUM MORSE 

At least you might have left 

us 
A shred of self-esteem: 
When you rate "Wizard" on 

a test, 
How "nitwitty" we seem! 



WALTER MOTTA 

Curly hair and flashing eyes 
Don't usually score zero; 
Maybe that's why Wally 

chose 
To be a football hero. 



GLADYS MUELLER 

Gladys as an artist 
Is someone to surpass, 
Her Xmas card and angels 
Were admired by every class. 



FRANCES MULCAHY 

She seems so very quiet 
With nothing much to say, 
It amazed us when we heard 
Her on her trumpet i>lay. 



ELSIE MULLANEY 

We've heard vou're partial 

the "Dutch," 
In fact, we know it's true; 
A diamond ring has told 

that 
It's wedding bells for you. 



ITA MURPHY 

Faith and begorra, shure 

we're that glad 
That we know little Ita, the 
erirl who wears plaid. 
She's a rose of old Ireland, 

that's easy to see — 
Tho' her Scotch dress would 

fool those who know less 

than we. 



22 



THE PILGRIM 



WILFRED NICKERSON 

Wilfred's a fashion savant, 

In fact, he's the stylist's de- 
light; 

He's also Mayor of our 
town — 

Hurrah for the blue and the 
white ! 



PHILIP O'CONNELL 

Some men flash a charming 

smile, 
Some men use their brawn — 
But the virtue of persistance 
Is what he depends upon. 



CLAIRE OTT1NO 

If you desire dancing 
For any type of show, 
Just go to Claire for 

advice — 
She really ot-ti-no. 



her 



BERNARD OTTO 

Bernard Otto had a seal, 
And we thought it fine — 
So he gave his seal to us, 
The Class of Thirty-Nine. 



MARY PAOLETTI 

thought 



it 



We've always 
most unfair 

For boys to have the curly 
hair, 

But there is justice here be- 
low — 

For your tresses tell us so. 



MARALYN PASCOE 

How many words a minute? 

We do not know her limit, 

But offer a prize 

For chatty replies 

And Amy P. would win it. 




ALBERTA PEDERZANI 

She rolls her eyes in ecstasy, 
For she has coppers handy; 
Now she'll again surrender to 
The lure of penny candy. 



JEANETTE PICARD 

A gentle answer 
And winning smile 
Make moments with her 
Worth our while. 



FRANKLIN PIERCE 

With your name you cannot 

shirk 
Though the struggle will be 

great — 
And, when you reach the 

White House, 
Make us poet laureate. 



FLORENCE PIMENTAL 

The ticking of his timepiece 
Around her dainty wrist 
Reminds her of the one boy 
She simply can't resist. 



JULIA PINA 

She jittei-s here, jitters there 
Jitters, jitters everywhere — 
But, as for us, we jitter best 
Just before a history test. 



CLARA PINTO 

Under blue Hawaiian skies 
She'd be more at home than 

we would, 
She could strum a mean 

guitar 
And do the things she should. 



THE PILGRIM 



23 



ROBERT PO 

The pencil leaves his paper 
And laughter follows soon; 
Then we all know that 

Bobby's drawn 
Another new cartoon. 



ARTHUR POIRIER 

We hear a paper's rustle, 
It's you the teachers accuse — 
You really merit the title of 
"The Face Behind the News." 



ROBERT PRATT 

He fain would create curls 
Atop milady's head — 
Purely a business matter? 
Or — -perhaps too much we've 
said. 



THOMAS PRENTICE 

Tommy's always "rosey", 
He always wears a smile, 
And in that green coupe 

his 
They ride around in style. 



of 



ROBERT PROCTOR 

He went to Maine 
To get a deer, 
Been better off 
If he'd stayed here. 



CONGETTA PROVINZANO 

She wields a mean dustcloth 
In Room 305 

That in order and beauty 
Young minds may thrive. 




CHARLOTTE RAYMOND 

Though men doubted our I. 
Q. 

And called us a Cheshire cat, 
If we owned a smile like hers, 
We'd emphasize the fact. 



ROBERT RAYMOND 

What his pecadillos are 
We really cannot say — 
He simply does what's to be 

done 
In an unpretentious way. 



DOROTHY REED 

She flies through the figures 
With the greatest of ease, 
This daring young maid 
On the bookkeeping trapeze. 



PHYLLIS REINHARDT 

It may not be significant, 
And then again it may — 
She and Paderewski 
Share the same birthday. 



JESSE REZENDES 

Though a small mustache is 

lacking 
And a domineering chin, 
To be Carver's first dictator 
Has long your day-dream 

been. 



RITA RIEDEL 

She's our official typist, 
And a waitress on the run; 
Rita surely gets around 
With only five feet one. 



24 



THE PILGRIM 



BARBARA ROGERS 

A woman's privilege 
To change her mind: 
Where the heart's concerned 
She's just the kind. 



ANTONETTE ROSSETTI 

Her attitude's 
Commendable, 
At work or play 
Dependable. 



EDWARD ROSSI 

"I'm a boy with a system," 

brags Putt, 
"At which I have lots of fun, 
Smile at all the pretty girls 
But never get stuck with 

one." 



MARGARET RUDOLPH 

When Margaret walks down 
the aisle 

Her wedding vows to stam- 
mer, 

We prophesy she'll step unto 

The beat of a cobbler's ham- 
mer. 



THOMAS RUGGIERO 

Jack be nimble, Jack be quick, 

Jack jump over a candle- 
stick: 

But even he hasn't what it 
takes 

To beat our Tommy on roller 
skates. 



DORIS RUPRECHT 

You graciously participate 
In everything we do — 
The honor of the best sport 
Sincerely goes to you. 




MARY RYAN 

So she's a 4H Club winner! 
But we show no surprise — 
For we've known for some 

ten years 
She's a princess in disguise. 



EUNICE SANTOS 

She's gay of heart: 
Come biting wind 
Or scorching sun — 
Her smile's undimmed. 



DOROTHY SCANLAND 

We know not what soap 
Produced such perfection, 
But she certainly has 
"That schoolgirl complexion." 



RUTH SCHILLING 

A warning we give you — 

watch out for Ruth! 

It's a family trait to be a 

sleuth. 
So if she pussyfoots up in 

disguise, 
Don't open your mouth or 

blink vour eves. 



RICHARD SCHNEIDER 

He doubtless gets grubby 

and dirty, 
But we've never seen him 

so — 
For sheer sartorial splendor 
He beats any boy we know. 



GLORIA SEAVER 

To search too long for adjec- 
tives 

Is hardly meritorious: 

Because, when all is said and 
done, 

Our Gloria is glorious. 



THE PILGRIM 



25 



WILLIAM SHEA 

Bib is our living proof 
That a boy prefers a blonde: 
But we haven't ascertained 
Of which one he is fond. 



SOLOMON SHWOM 

Sing a song of sixpence 
Black faces in a row: 
When Solly warbled merrily, 
He almost stole the show. 



AGNES SILVA 

"Silva" strains from her 

violin 
Tell us that Agnes strives 
To fill our world with music 
And brighten up our lives. 



RICHARD SILVA 

Under a bushel 

His light he won't hide: 

In proclaiming his presence 

He feels justified. 



OLIVIA SOARES 

Whatever knowledge 
Can be gained from a book 
She seeks for herself 
In some quiet nook. 



MARIO SOLIERI 

Say "Si" Solieri and you'll 
find 

Your mouth is full of sibil- 
ants, 

But the reason for the nick- 
name 

Defies our vigilance. 




LAWRENCE SPRINGER 

Lawrence is the boy who 
lives on a farm, 

Where in the country he does 
no harm: , 

But when he comes to town 
for a day — 

That's when he starts mak- 
ing hay. 



JOHN SPURR 

There are many ways 

To rise in the world: 

Just look at John 

When his legs he's uncurled. 



GEORGE STEFANI 

"You must have been a beau- 
tiful baby, 

You must have been a won- 
derful child," 

'Cause over you in "S-ca- 
pades" 

The audience went wild. 



RICHARD STRASSELL 

We are not saying 
You look bovine, 
But you do chew your cud 
A good part of the time. 



HELEN SWIFT 

When our elders tell us 

Of the virtues that they had, 

We could offer Helen 

To prove we're not so bad. 



JOHN TORRES 

In the morning when it's fair, 

Does your mother wave your 
hair? 

For that wave, you must con- 
fess, 

Really outdoes nature's best. 



26 



THE PILGRIM 



RICHARD TUBBS 

He's a Pied Piper with a sax 
And we're the babes who 

follow after: 
Gayly he leads us on our way 
With corny jokes and gusty 

laughter. 



MARTHA VICKERY 

She will not mount a soap- 
box, 

She would not be town 
crier — 

In numbers there is safety: 

She speaks in the speaking 
choir. 



VIRGINIA VINTON 

Most buds bloom in wann 

sunshine, 
Her "Bud" is no exception — 
For when to Ginny's house he 

goes, 
He gets a warm reception. 



ELLA VITTI 

"Ode to Minerva" 
She wrote with finesse, 
Than Browning or Kipling 
She does no less. 



VIRGINIA WESTON 

"Sano mens in sano corpore" 
Is finer far than wealth; 
So every single afternoon 
She goes walking — for her 
health ? 



CHARLOTTE WHITING 

Three times a week from 

Whitman 
He comes in his automo — 

BEAL. 
We know she calls him 

Harold, 
Though his surname she 

won't reveal. 




VIRGINIA YOUNG 

"Hello! This is Eddie," 
As if there were only one! 
But figuring just which he is 
Is her idea of fun. 



GERALD ZIEGENGEIST 

It seems to us that Jerry 
Will come down with a fever 
Unless he stops this constant 
Working like a "Beever". 



MARY ZUCCHELLI 

We bet if we lighted 

A four-inch salute 

And threw it beside you — 

You'd not give a hoot. 





THE PILGRIM 



27 



DOTTY BIOGRAPHIES 



Richard Tubbs . . . senior class pres- 
ident . . desires to be a journalist . . was 
born in Westfield, Massachusetts, on 
February 20, 1922 . . is five feet eight 
and one-half inches tall . . has dark hair 
and greenish brown eyes . . says his fa- 
vorite pastime is "playing policeman" . . 
is a charter member of the "Swanky 
Swing Society" . . likes Artie Shaw's 
orchestra . . enjoys listening to "Deep 
Purple" . . belongs to the S. A. S. . . is a 
member of the band and orchestra . . is 
lighting technician of the Speaking 
Choir . . ten cents-a-week collector . .was 
vice-president of the S. A. S. in his 
junior year and vice-president of the 
class . . was on the executive board of 
the Camera Club . . was editor-in-chief 
of the Press Club . . is assistant-editor- 
in-chief of the Pilgrim . . president of 
the Correspondence Club . . . chooses 
photography as his hobby . . announces 
his pet peeves are people who don't 
mind their own business and people who 
tickle him . . indulges in collecting little 
blue ribbons . . likes Evening in Paris 
perfume . . intends to take a P. G. 
course next year and later attend 
Boston University. 

George Banker . . . vice-president of 
the class . . was born in Plymouth, Octo- 
ber 13, 1922 . . says his birthday falls on 
Friday the 13th this year . . says he is 
not superstitious ... is five feet eight 
inches tall . . has brown hair and brown 
eyes . . has had a consuming interest in 
aircraft ever since he can remember . . 
was a member of the Press Club in his 
junior year . . is a member of the Avia- 
tion Club . . has no pet peeves and says 
nothing bothers him . . was a member of 
the football squad for two years . . . 
demonstrated his efficiency on dance 
committees . . admits that his favorite 
pastime is repairing small firearms . . 
also likes to collect bullets . . has a very 
pleasing personality . . hopes to attend 
Northeastern University. 

Frances Brown . . . most efficient 
treasurer . . . has light brown hair and 
blue eyes, .likes to ski and collect stamps 
. . . doodles with a pencil as a pastime . . 
celebrated her seventeenth birthday on 
last August 8th . . has been a class treas- 
urer for three years . . was a member of 
the S. A. S. council as a sophomore and 
junior . . is on the S. A. S. executive 
board and the executive board of the 
Correspondence Club . . is a member of 
the Honor Group and secretary of the 



National Honor Society . . belongs to the 
Glee Club . . likes the song "Night and 
Day" and the bands of Artie Shaw and 
Larry Clinton . . plans to attend Kath- 
erine Gibb's Secretarial School in the 
fall. 

Ita Murphy . . . capable secretary . . 
plays hockey and basketball . . desires to 
have red hair and become an air stew- 
ardess . . is five feet two and one-half 
inches tall . has light brown hair and 
blue eyes . . was born in Plymouth, Aug- 
ust 30, 1921 . . says her greatest dis- 
appointments are Weymouth and Whit- 
man victories over Plymouth . . decided 
her greatest joy was when the Plymouth 
Basketball team beat Braintree . . is a 
member of the Senior Honor Group and 
National Honor Society . . serves as a 
member of the program committee for 
the Correspondence Club . . is a member 
of the S. A. S. council . . Pilgrim Staff 
. . Speaking Choir . . has 154 pet peeves, 
Latin III and 153 jingles for the Senior 
class . . likes to tickle people as a pastime 
. . says that her favorite cloth is plaid 
and her favorite color is green . . has 
24c more to collect on her bet with John 
Canducci . . places Artie Shaw's orches- 
tra above any other. 



OUR CITADEL 

We stood on the brink of knowledge: 

We saiv Truth from afar; 

We lifted the latch to the magic 

gate — 
Our guide ivas a distant star. 

We took ttvo friends on the journey: 

Faith and the Courage to do; 

Lord of the Hosts gave us strength 

for our task — 
His ivill to guide us through. 

The path ivas rough, and we 

stumbled: 
Many dropped out on the tvay; 
Then our path lit up with the light of 

Hope: 
God's gift: the advent of day! 

Thus Truth was our aim and we 

found her: 
She brandished her scepter high; 
The goal of our dreams was reached 

at last: 
Our citadel in the sky! 

We've opened the gate of knowledge: 
Make feast of the golden store; 
Drink deep of the cup that we hold 

to-day — 
We'll pass this tvay no more! 

. Robert Raymond 



(llasa Staitaltrs 



Name Nickname 

Edith Adams "Red" 

Constance Addyman "Connie" 



Elizabeth Baker 


"Dib" 


Madeline Baker 


"Lyn" 


Katnerine Baratta 


"Katie" 


Brooks Barnes 


"Slim" 


Joan Beever 


"Jo" 


.Dolores Bernardo 


"Dolly" 


Hose Bernardo 


"Trouble" 


Barbara Brown 


"Barby" 


Frances Brown 


"Franny" 


Tiliie Bussolari 


"Farmer" 


Ceserine Campana 


"Nini" 


Dallas Carpenter 


"Texas" 


Mary Carvaiho 


"Mimi" 


Doris Caswell 


"Dot" 


Doris Chadwick 


"Dopey" 


Harriet Childs 


"Harry" 


Janie Christie 


"Jan" 


Barbara Coggeshall 


"Barb" 


Elizabeth Coleman 


"Betty" 


Dorothy Correa 


"Dottie" 


Edith DeCost 


"Edie" 


Friscilla Douglass 


"Pris" 


Betsey Drew 


"Bets" 


Eleanor Fascioli 


"Fash" 


Mary Fernandes 


"Snooky" 


Belmira Ferreira 


"Bella" 


Marilyn Oilman "Blue Eyes" 


Jennie Giori 


"Jezzie" 


Shirley Goldsmith 


"Goldy" 


Alice Govi 


"Snookie" 


Mildred Govoni 


"Chubby" 


Rosemonde Grant 


"Rosie" 


Helen Guidetti 


"Guidy" 


Elizabeth Hanelt 


"Libby" 


Jeanette Harty 


"Jan" 


Beverly Henrion 


"Bev" 


Christine Hogan 


"Chris" 


Jane Holmes 


"Ace" 


Ruth Holtz 


"Ruthie" 


Margaret Kaiser 


"Peggy" 


Mary Kelly 


"May" 


Miriam Ketchen 


"Mium" 


Catherine Leonardi 


"Kitty" 


Dorothy Lodi 


"Dot" 


Frances Lodi 


'Frannie" 


Harriet Longhi 


"Harry" 


Linda Longinotti 


"Lindy" 


Mary Mahler "Sleepyhead" 


Iole Marvelli 




Mary McCosh 


"Mac" 


Emily McEwen 


"Dorky" 


Laura MacLean 


"Sugar" 


Gladys Mueller 


"Toss" 


Frances Mulcahy ' 


'Frannie" 


Elsie Mullaney 


"Toots" 


Ita Murphy 


Scotchie" 


Claire Ottino 


"Shrimp" 


Mary Paoletti 


"Maria" 


Maralyn Pascoe 


"Lyn" 


Alberta Pederzani 


"Bert" 


Jeanette Picard 


"Pickie" 


Florence Pimental 


"Flo" 


Julia Pina 


"Jukie" 


Clara Pinto 


"Duckie" 


Congetta Provinzano 


"Connie" 


Charlotte Raymond 


"Curly" 


Dorothy Reed 


"Dottie" 


Phyllis Reinhardt 


"Phyl" 


Rita Riedel 


"Peanut" 


Barbara Rogers "Josephine" 


Antonette Rossetti 


"Toni" 


Margaret Rudolph 


"Margy" 


Doris Ruprecht 


"Chis" 


Mary Ryan 


"Red" 


Eunice Santos 


"Euny" 



Ambition 

To be an ocean liner stewardess 

To be Delilah 

To be able to make dresses 

To be the eighth dwarf 

To be a teacher 

To travel around the world 

To drive a truck 

Not to be a Mrs. 

To have a musical career 

To be a better jitterbug 

To go to the World's Fair 

To go places 

To be a certain Mrs. 

To be a musician 

To induce Nini to buy a comb 

To be an artist 

To get an "A" in Bookkeeping 

To be a farmerette 

To be a cowgirl 

To be quiet in Mr. Smiley's class 

Not to become a "mad" artist 

To become Guido's wife 

To sleep in the morning 

To be a nurse 

To be as good as her sister 

To beat Don Budge 

To be a figure skater 

To be Mrs. Correa 

To be a good roller skater 

To be radio's best "Blues Singer" 

To find somebody true 

To be a girl in white 

To be thin 

To go around the woi'ld 

To be a hairdresser 

To live in Pembroke 

To be wiser than most girls 



Hobby 

Cooking 

Knitting 

Singing 

Collecting pitchers 

Classical music 

Knitting 

Knitting 

Dancing 

Singing 

Jitterbugging 

Collecting dust 

Collecting souvenirs 

Reading 

Dancing 

Stamp collecting 

Drawing 

Knitting 

Sketching 

Knitting 

Hairdi-essing 

Drawing 

Dancing 

Knitting 

Dancing 

Sports 

Listening to the radio 

Singing 

Sitting in the parlor 

Bicycle riding 

Bicycle riding 

My diary 

Dancing 

Hiking 

Camera 

Autographs 

Movies 

Sleeping 



To be a hairdresser Collecting popular song sheets 

To be a second Florence Nightingale Collecting hair bows 
To discover a pest exterminator Sports 

To decide Collecting bracelets 

To become a fancy ice skater Dancing 

To meet Jackie Cooper Movies 

To be a librarian Reading 

To learn more football Collecting "certain" football news 

To sing in Jay's orchestra Dancing 

To be with a certain person Collecting movie star pictures 



To meet the "Dead End Kids" 

To become a famous illustrator 

To be a good wife 

To be a designer 

To lose about twenty pounds 

To own a "Hennery" 

To travel as a millionaire 

To be a gorgeous red-head 

To go to China 

To hear wedding bells 



Movies 

Drawing 

Reading 

"Art" 

Drawing woman's fashions 

Tennis 

Riding 

Keeping a scrap book 

Tennis 

Dancing 



To collect her 25c bet from John Canducci Coming by things 



To be a famous dancer 

To make good shorthand outlines 

To remember you 

To sock "Peanut" back 

To see her name in lights 

To be a hairdresser 

To be a popular singer 

To be an artist 

To be an explorer 

To be a beautician 

To have her own home 

To be another Paderewski 

To travel 

To live down her nickname 

To have an apartment of her own 

To stay single 

To take a trip to Sweden 

To travel 

To be different 



Dancing 

Collecting jokes 

Stamps 

Reading 

Singing 

Dancing 

Singing and dancing 

Interior decorating 

Traveling 

Dancing 

Collecting sheet music 

Seashells 

Scrapbooks 

Jitterbugging 

Dancing 

Sewing 

Bookkeeping 

Knitting 

Knitting 



Dorothy Scanland 


"Dot" 


Ruth Schilling 


"Toots" 


Gloria Seaver 


"Googie" 


Agnes Silva 


"Aggie" 


Helen Swift 


"Lorrie" 


Olivia Soares 


"Oily" 


Martha Vickery 


"Marty" 


Virginia Vinton 


"Ginny" 


Ella Vitti 


"Silver" 


Virginia Weston 


"Pudgey" 


Charlotte Whiting 


"Charlie" 


Virginia Young 


"Ginny" 


Mary Zucchelli 


"Marie" 


Lester Anderson 


"Let" 


George Banker 


"Bud" 


Parker Barnes 


"Park" 


Edward Bibeau 


"Eddie" 


David Bodell 


"Bottel" 


Edward Bradford 


"Ebby" 


Charles Brewster 


"Biceps" 


Angelo Brigida 


"Angie" 


John Cadorette " 


Professor" 


John Canducci 


"Canny" 


James Caramello 


"Jimmy" 


Albert Cristani 


"Peppy" 


Alfred Darsch 


"Chip" 


Warren Diegoli 


"Drig" 


William Disalvatore "Willie" 


Paul Douglas 


"Doc" 


John Dunuis 


"Dupe" 


Joseph Farina 


"Joe" 


Alfred Francis 


"Smoky" 


Gilbert Freeman 


"Bucky" 


Thomas Fugazzi 


"Tommy" 


David Furtado 


"Flash" 


William Goodwin 


"Bill" 


Donald Heath 


"Red" 


Philip Henning 


"Bud" 


Vernon Hogan 


"Hogie" 


John Hogan 


"Shanty" 


Wendell Holmes 


"Huck" 


Robert Hughes 


"Husie" 


Beverly James 


"Bev" 


James Iodice 


"Jam" 


Richard Lanman 




"Powerhouse" 


Robert Lee 


"Oscar" 


Harrison Longhi 


"Harry" 


Robert Lowry 


"Bobby" 


Herbert MacBride 


"Mac" 


Nahum Morse 


"Hammy" 


Walter Motta 


"Moses" 


Wilfred Nickerson 


"Willy" 


Philin O'Connell 


"Phil" 


Bernard Otto 


"Stretch" 


Franklin Pierce 


"Frankie" 


Robert Po ' 


'Snatcher" 


Arthur Poirier 


"Hummy" 


Robert Pratt 


"Prattie" 


Thomas Prentice ' 


Snowball" 


Robert Proctor 


"Bobby" 


Robert Raymond 


"Bob" 


Jesse Rezendes 


"Jinks" 


Edward Rossi 


"Putt" 


Thomas Ruggeiro 


"Ruggy" 


Richard Schneider 


"Dick" 


William Shea 


"Bib" 


Solomon Shwom 


"Sullv" 


Richard Silva 


"Dick" 


Mario Soleiri 


"Cy" 


Lawrence Springer 


"Larry" 


John Spun* 


"Johnny" 


George Stefani 


"Stef" 


Richard Strassel 


"Dickie" 


John Torres 


"Johnnie" 


Richard Tubbs 


'Dynamo" 


Charles Walker 


"Blimp" 


Gerald Ziegengeist 


"Gerry" 



To play a duet with Rubinoff 

To own her own riding stables 

To hold her temper 

To go on a world cruise 

To bang harder on the piano 

To be a wife 

To learn to skate 

To appreciate "swing" 

To learn how to knit 

To live in Texas 

To grow upward 

To travel 

To visit Annapolis 

To make doughnuts with larger holes 

To be a "Soldier of Misfortune" 

To work in a woolen industry 

To be a business man 

To become a lineman 

To enjoy himself 

To be an expert photographer 

To be a licensed clam-digger 

To be a scientist 

To save money 

To wake up and live 

To be a baseball plaver 

To be an electrician 

To be an aviator 

To join the Navy 

To marry a rich, good-looking girl 

To be a Diesel engineer 

To be able to think of an ambition 

To travel 

To produce his own minstrel show 

To be a big league baseball player 

To be a coach 

To fly from pole to pole 

To be an office manager 

To exterminate Artie Shaw's orchestra 



Violins 

Riding 

Knitting 

Music 

Piano playing 

Movies 

Anything that's fun 

Doing others' homework 

Not doing homelessons 

Badminton 

Swimming 

Sports 

Movies 

Making doughnuts 

Aviation 

Sports 

Collecting photographs 

Aviation 

School 

Photography 

Sports 

Astronomy 

Spending it 

To make money 

Baseball 

Raising rabbits 

Model airplane building 

Swimming 

Guns 

Fixing flat tires 

To do anything he likes 

Hunting and fishing 

Singing 

Raising rabbits 

Sports 

Aviation 

Hunting 

To learn Dick Lan- 



To find a life's work 

To be remembered 

To own a schooner 

To play baseball for the Yankees 

To be a mechanic 

To go places 



man's favorite orchestra 

Saving pennies 

Sports 

Outdoor sports 

Playing drums 

Sports 

Stamp collecting 



To play with Artie Shaw 

To own a plane 

To show up Benny Goodman 

To keep things "Pat" 

To be a good sax plaver 

To own a Cadillac V-16 

To be an aviator 

To hike to Chiltonville 

To know all, see all, and do all 

To shoot a goose 

To own a yacht 

To travel to the most remote places 

To retire at 65 

To be a stylist 

To be a wit 

To own a store 

To "out fiddle" Fiedler 

To find a 1969 penny 

To see the world 

To be Fred Astaire's competitor 

To compete against Louie Armstrong 



To be a good hockey player 
To be a good goalie 
To have a real swing band 
To travel 

To become a conservation expert 
To travel 
To be a mechanic 
To do something worth while 
To go 1000 miles an horn- 
To report for a "large" newspaper 
To go places 
To be a success 



Swing music 

Aviation 

Sleeping 

Sailing 

Fixing- automobiles 

Playing the harmonica 

Outdoor sports 

Airplanes 

Yachting 

Hunting and fishing 

Tipping over in cars 

Collecting Indian relics 

Scrapbooks 

Styles 

Tinkering with Fords 

Talking pictures 

Reading about motion pictures 

Collecting pictures of royalty 

Drawing 

Hunting 

Collecting musical 

instruments 

Sports 

Sports 

Dancing 

Building model planes 

Reading and swimming 

Fishing 

Singing 

Skating 

Building miniature planes 

Photography 

Girls 

Aviation 



30 



THE PILGRIM 



THEY AIN'T WHAT THEY USED TO BE ! 





^T> 







Row 1: Miss Locklin, Miss Lang, Miss Johnson, Miss Kelly 

Row 2: Mr. Garland, Miss Jacques, Mrs. Garvin 

Row 3: Miss Humphrey, Mr. Shipman, Mrs. Raymond, Miss Rafter 



vb 



THE PILGRIM 



31 



DO YOU BELIEVE IN SIGNS? 

V\0 you drive a car? If not, you prob- 
ably will do so eventually. When that 
time comes, you will find it desirable, 
yes, necessary — to conform to a great 
many regulations and rules of the road 
if you wish to escape inconvenience and 
possible disaster. Assuming that most 
operators wish to drive safely and real- 
izing that the others must be con- 
strained to do so, lights and signs have 
been placed at strategic points to serve 
as guides and warnings which must be 
obeyed in the interest of safety. I think 
the best example of self-discipline I 
have ever observed is the way and man- 
ner in which the majority of drivers 
stop at a red light, even late at night 
when no other car is in sight, and wait 
until it becomes green. Perhaps the 
chance that an officer may be hiding be- 
hind a tree may act as a deterrent, but 
I think most operators just accept the 
situation and act accordingly. All of 
this leads me to a consideration of the 
connotations of some of the signs we 
frequently observe. 

Take, for example, the sign "Go 
Right." Obedience to this injunction is 
comoaratively easy of accomplishment. 
So it is with "Keep Right". But when 
one is giving direction to his own life, 
which is of far greater consequence 
than drving a car, the execution 
becomes more difficult. This is because 
"right" takes on a different meaning 
and is construed to implv distinction 
from wrong or improper. Here is where 
w<* find ourselves at times up against a 
veal nroblem, for has it not been said 
that "what is one man's meat, is an- 
other man's poison"? Don't we ask our- 
selves. "What is right, anyhow?" Per- 
hans I can help you find the answer. 

It is obvious that certain thoughts, 
words, and deeds can be definitely cata- 
Wnpd as "right" and "wrong", but it 
is likewise true that others cannot be so 
readilv classified. Standards are chang- 
ing. Practices are now accepted as 
nroner which would have caused many 
neoole to throw up their hands in horror 
when I was your age. The result is that 
we are constantly called upon to ap- 
praise our standards and, if need be, 
revise some of our pre-conceived ideas. 
In so doing we are certain to have 
doubts and possibly some qualms of con- 
science. In my own experience I have 
found it helpful, when I am confronted 
with the auestion, "Is this contemplated 
action right or wrong?", to test it out ! 



with three counter-questions. 

The first of these three questions is, 
"How will this affect me personally?" 
Will it benefit me in any way? Will it 
contribute to my physical well-being, 
add to my store of knowledge, and lead 
to a better understanding and appre- 
ciation of the spiritual values of life? 
Are the returns worth the time and ef- 
fort involved? Can I do it and keep my 
self -respect, even if nobody knows about 
it? In other words, will the results be 
constructive and helpful and enrich my 
life and experience? If the answer is 
"Yes," then I conclude that the proposed 
line of action is right and I accept it ; if 
"No", then I reject it forthwith. 

The second question is, "How is this 
going to affect others — my family, 
friends, and associates?" Will it weaken 
or strengthen my influence for good? 
Will it enhance or lessen their respect 
for me? If any are disposed to follow 
my example, in which direction am I 
leading them? How will it affect the 
welfare and happiness of my family? 
You see, very often the question of right 
or wrong concerns not only the individ- 
ual but also his associates, and becomes 
thereby a social question. It is quite 
possible that an action which would be 
entirely harmless to me as an individ- 
ual might be misunderstood, with the 
result that some one might inadvert- 
entlv be misled. I feel that the answers 
to this second question deserve careful 
consideration. 

The third question is, "What would 
happen if everybody did it?" As a mem- 
ber of society every last one of us is 
bound to consider this aspect of the 
nroblem. It involves not only what we 
do but what we do not do. Suppose 
everybody were .selfish, inconsiderate 
of the welfare of others, careless, lazy, 
or dishonest? What would be the conse- 
nuences if everybody gambled or drank 
intoxicating liquor to excess? What 
would happen to our cherished democ- 
racy if everybody neglected to perform 
his full civic duty? Imagine living in a 
community in which nobody attended 
church or supported religious, charit- 
able, and philanthropic organizations. 
When we remember that society is no 
better than the individuals who com- 
pose it, you will understand, I am sure, 
whv I stress this third qquestion. 

I could, if space permitted, give you 
any number of illustrations and ex- 
amples to strengthen the validity of 
^~ what I have stated in somewhat general 
terms. But I leave it to you to exercise 



32 



THE PILGRIM 



your judgment, to consider all the factors 
and possible consequences whenever you 
face the many problems which must 
arise in your experience. I am, however, 
inclined strongly to the belief that, if 
you will apply the tests I have sug- 
gested, you will not make any serious 
mistakes, and for the most part you will 
not only "Go Right", but also "Keep 
Right". 

Wayne M. Shipman, 

Principal 



Tribute to Our Best Citizen 

fHE Class of '39 has honored Brooks 
Barnes by bestowing on her the title 
of its best citizen. The requirements for 
this distinction are four in number : de- 
pendability, service, leadership, and 
patriotism. Through her four years in 
high school Brooks has served her class 
in such a way as to assure her election 
on these bases. 

Her first year she played basketball, 
baseball, and hockey and was a member 
of the Student Activities Society Exec- 
utive Board, representing her class. 

As a sophomore she continued her 
service on the Executive Board and was 
elected secretary of her class. 

Last year she made the first team in 
hockey. She became Girls' Sports Editor 
and also served her apprenticeship as 
assistant-business manager on the "Pil- 
grim" staff, displaying a versatility that 
we had more than once surmised. 

And now in her senior year Brooks 
has culminated her high school achieve- 
ments by being elected President of the 
S. A. S. and business manager of the 
school year book, the first girl to hold 
this responsible position. 

Brooks has been a member of many 
dance committees and school projects, 
doing her part to insure their success 
with a cheerfulness that has won her 
many friends. 

The Class of '39 believes it has chosen 
wiselv because, to substantiate its choice, 
Brooks has recently been announced a 
member of the Honor Group and been re- 
elected to membership in the National 
Honor Society. 

Frances Brown. 



WHAT WOULD HAPPEN 

If Gerald Ziegengeist lost his cheery 

smile. 
If Virginia Weston were not pursuing a 

different boy. 
If Ita Murphy were really Scotch. 
If John Dupuis bought a brand new car. 



If Brooks Barnes couldn't find Miss 
Carey or Miss Jacques at recess. 

If Virginia Vinton lost her worn-out 
Southern drawl. 

If Betty Coleman lost her interest in un- 
derclassmen. 

If Harrison Longhi grew as tall as John 
Brewer. 

If Claire Ottino stopped making faces 
and grew up. 

If Richard Tubbs became a French pro- 
fessor. 

If Emily McEwen were early for any- 
thing. 

If John Canducci ever thought with his 
mouth closed. 

If Paul Douglas were caught belittling 
the Scotch. 

If Angelo Brigida went into the meat- 
packing business. 

If Joseph Farina didn't have an alibi. 

If Nahum Morse became a famous 
opera singer. 

If Robert Lowry received a Latin schol- 
arship. 

If James Caramello had a Harvard clip. 



CLASS SUPERLATIVES 

Girl who has done the most for '39 

— Brooks Barnes 
Boy who has done the most for '39 

— Nahum Morse 
Most dignified girl — Madeline Baker 
Most dignified boy — Robert Raymond 
Most studious girl — Edith DeCost 
Most studious boy — Philip O'Connell 
Best-natured girl — Mildred Govoni 
Best-natured boy — Gilbert Freeman 
Best girl athlete — Tillie Bussolari 
Best boy athlete — Beverly James 
Class actor — John Canducci 
Class actress — Shirley Goldsmith 
Class musician — Richard Silva 
Class artist — Linda Longinotti 
Class poet— Ella Vitti 
Class wit — Richard Tubbs 
Best girl dancer — Margaret Kaiser 
Best boy dancer — James Iodice 
Class baby — Claire Ottino 
Class giant — Alfred Darsch 
Class flirt — Virginia Weston 
Class sheik — Vernon Hogan 
Class orator — Gerald Ziegengiest 
Most retiring girl — Doris Caswell 
Most courteous girl — Ita Murphy 
Most courteous boy — Paul Douglas 
Most talkative — Richard Lanman 
Class girl singer — Julia Pina 
Class boy singer — William Goodwin 
Best-dressed girl — Alice Govi 
Best-dressed boy — Robert Lowrv 
Early bird of '39— Dolores Bernardo 
Late bird of '39 — Johnny Dupuis 
Best personality — Jane Holmes 
Best personality — Thomas Prentice 



THE PILGRIM 



33 



SONGS OLD AND NEW 



We're Back in Circulation Again 

Wake Up and Live 

You Showed Us The Way 

Our Song 

Supposing 

Where Are You? 

Everybody Sing 

One Two Button Your Shoe 

Serenade in The Night 

The Lady Likes to Love 

Cafe Continental 

Slap That Bass 

There's No Two Ways About It 

That's Southern Hospitality 

Gone With The Dawn 

Pickin' Up Speed 

Trust In Me 

Hi! Ho! Silver 

There's Something in the Air 

Cute Little Headache 

Variety Is The Spice of Life 

Deep in a Dream 

For The First Time 

Here I Am Doing It 

(With) Heart and Soul 

Havin' Myself A Time 

How Can You Forget? 

Now It Can Be Told 

Mirrors Don't Tell Lies 

My Walking Stick 

Old Folks 

Two Sleepy People 

Small Fry 

Sunny Side of Things 

The Night Is Filled With Music 

With You On My Mind 

What's Good About Good-night? 

The Latin Quarter 

Just A Simple Melody 

Please Come Out of Your Dream 

Just A Kid Named Joe 

Put Your Heart In The Song 

It's The Little Things That Count 

Angels With Dirty Faces 

Wanted 

Let's Put Our Heads Together 

Swing High! Swing Low! 

You Can't Take That Away From Me 

Am I In Another World? 

Too Marvelous For Words 



Pilgrim Staff 

Class of '40 

The faculty 

"All Hail To Plymouth High" 

We didn't graduate 

Class of '41 

Mr. Cramer 

Dressing after gym 

'Neath Ginny's window 

Barbara Rogers 

Lunch counter 

"Bud" Henning 

You pass or you don't 

Virginia Vinton 

Inspirations for poems 

Johnny Dupuis 

School Band 

Dick's Theme Song 

When you're called to the office 

Homelessons 

"Scotchie" 

In study hall 

We're sorry school's over 

Graduating 

We do our homelessons 

President Tubbs 

High School Days 

Why we're so clever in physics 

In the girls' room 

"Bev" and his cane 

At our 50th reunion 

Pierce and Lanman 

Davie and Albert 

When there're no tests 

Class Night 

History Test 

Chris and Dick 

Room 30 

Our Citadel 

Mr. Bagnall to Pierce 

Joe Farina 

Miss Hunt 

Daily quizzes 

Minstrel chorus 

Work for seniors 

Football squad 

P. H. S. Jitterbugs 

High school memories 

Commencement Night 

Mrs. Raymond 




BLACK CAT 

I like to watch the liquid muscles 

Flow along the fence, 
And lie in silken onyx folds 

In feline opulence — 
As proud as any Nubian black 

Beside the River Nile, 
With heavy-lidded, golden eyes 

Superlative with guile: 
Employing when advisable 

The only implement 
That Nature has provided 

To signify content. 

Frances Mulcahy '39 



34 



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THE PILGRIM 



35 



ECCENTRICITIES OF FAMOUS (?) PERSONS 



PERSON 
Richard Tubbs 
George Banker 

Ita Murphy 
Frances Brown 
Paul Douglas 
Thomas Ruggiero 
Nahum Morse 
Brooks Barnes 
Robert Raymond 
Ella Vitti 
Joan Beever 
Gerald Ziegengeist 

James Caramello 
Tillie Bussolari 

Linda Longinotti 
Beverly James 



OF THE CLASS OF '39 

POSITION 

Class President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
Scotch baritone 
Dancer no. 1 

Editor-in-chief of "Pilgrim" 
Business manager 
Author of class song 
Author of class poem 
Champion ticket seller 
Orator no. 1 

Captain of the football team 

Captain of hockey and basket- 
ball teams 

Artist no. 1 

Captain of basketball team 



ECCENTRICITY 

Corny jokes 

Picking hairs off Connie 
Addyman 

Wearing Scotch plaids 

Winking at strangers 

His outboard motor 

Flirting with teachers 

Walking in his sleep 

Dieting off and on 

Raiding the ice-box 

Chewing bubble gum 

Picking threads off people 

Chumming with John Can- 
ducci 

Going 70 m. p. h. in a '34 Ford 

Trying to sing opera 

Dancing in her stocking feet 
Pretending he is a swing band 




HONOR GROUP 
First Row: Frances Brown, Linda Longinotti, Ita Murphy, Joan Beever, 

Julia Pina 
Second Row: Mary McCosh, Janie Christie, Brooks Barnes, Robert Raymond, 

Eleanor Fascioli, Harriet Longhi 



36 



THE PILGRIM 



k Ode to nincfua. " * 

l )'+U L- , . e|k Vrtt ' 

¥ j , '^ el P^'sed^you,. h e a ^t ?s free 
lo duJell inpenstv/e reveffe 3 
Rnd wiH your age-old eyes apprarse 
Ouv rep |tc<* s Aialf uji°oc<oh ■(• f ti sto ne, 

ntneWGL, you shall carve us oj/o> 

Led by youf u>?Sdo f-n^s •ft-prn dej'jrj, 

Ffnd -f»>om yooi* coo r\ol rocs ha.nds, shall spi°fno 

the class o-f nineteen thiptcj^nrn^ 

Butg OPOTnervao. pause not /o n q° 

U . 

rieav once again you-ip chisel's rin^ 

Rrtd 90.-fcHe.-p the |. et L/mLe^t chips 
Toujhfch unipoKen soVVOuJS c(fr,oo 
For -these ave lessons Life nas * ' -. 
TW^ll sob«| a at^c^el * 
So ^cKly he^a^ay the stone 
Or eager hearts ^ /ose. * hei> ^ . 

i,^ 6 ^ a y Safneach fond des ? « 
?" ^""'P^ess , ^ay the* be not *,. 

'no-V cause. ou>° L £. i.r 
Mold high ou ,o ^ otto ,, ,| , ,. a '° 

The stone ^ au f , 1/m ,^ ^ e " > "«** 




/M/MMffMgffl'MW/t^^ ^,,^^ 




LoLoncjinoTtf 




THE PILGRIM 



37 




THE ART OF LIVING 

TT is very probable that most people 

never think of the "art" there is in 
living. There is an art to living, never- 
theless, and that is what we hope to 
prove with this editorial. 

What do the majority of people do 
for variety? We casually sit back and 
let the rest of the world go by. It's the 
same old thing every day of every year. 
We get up, go to work, come home, and, 
perhaps, go to a movie and then to bed. 
Needless to say, we have dreams of 
great things, practically all human be- 
ings do — but only a few ever summon 
enough ambition to make dreams come 
true. 

In the school lives of many boys and 
girls there is the same problem — too 
much of one thing. One boy will study 
and do his lessons faithfully, which, of 
course, is a definite asset to him. But — 
that is his only ambition. He is perfectly 
contented to sit down and do his home- 
work well. Farthest from his thoughts 
is wholesome exercise in the out-of- 
doors. He thinks he gets enough exer- 
cise by walking home from school. 

Then there is another type of boy. 
Football, basketball, and baseball are 
the essentials in his everyday life. Dur- 
ing school hours his mind wanders to 
that beautiful pass in the second 
nuarter. As soon as the two o'clock bell 
has rung, it's down to the football field 
he goes. As a result, his schoolwork is 
neglected. 

The third, and perhaps the worst type, 
is the boy who thinks of little but — 
swim, rain or shine, never wears a hat 
"What am I going to do tonight? What 
girl shall I date up?" He is the kind who 
spends all his spare time with a comb 
and mirror. His schoolwork is fair and 
his ability to tell you how good he is in 
sports (which he never enters) is excel- 
lent. 

The true "art" of living is created by 
combining these three ingredients, ad- 
ding one more — religion — stirring vig- 
orously, and producing a balanced, four- 
fold life of religious, physical, mental, 
and social development. 

Emily McEwen '39 



EDUCATE THE PUBLIC 

CWING is without a doubt one of the 
most misused words in the English 
language today. It is officially a word, 
as Webster has accepted it, but most 
people have no true conception of its 
meaning. Whenever people hear music 
that is loud and fast, they cheer, while 
the older, more conservative people, who 
still enjoy "You Wore a Tulip," turn 
thumbs down. 

The jitterbug is as much a menace to 
the immortality of good swing music as 
are the "long hairs." They cheapen it 
and make it appear fantastic and ridic- 
ulous in the eyes of the public, and when 
I say "public", I mean the average 
American who is bewildered by swing. 
This is undoubtedly because he doesn't 
understand it and makes no effort to 
try to. This can also be said of the "long 
hair" or classical music lover who forms 
the profession's greatest opposition. 
Another reason swing is not in complete 
favor is that it is personified and played 
at its best by the negro, and many per- 
sons are too prejudiced to admit its true 
value as a type of American music. 

Still another reason why swing is re- 
tarded is that too many inferior mu- 
sicians have risen to prominence and 
too many novelty instruments and songs 
have come into existence. This is exemp- 
lified by the fact that Kay Kyser is 
drawing a large salary every Wednes- 
day evening for making funny noises 
and using a southern drawl, while 
Count Basie and Bob Crosby, two real 
swing bands, play for a smaller, but 
more sincere, audience for much less 
money. Another example of this is the 
quick rise of such novelty songs as 
"The Music Goes Round and Round," 
"Knock-Knock", and the more recent fa- 
vorites. "A Tisket A Tasket" and "Flat 
Foot Floogie." If people would pay 
more attention to good, all-round 
musicianship, regardless of race or 
color, and less to appearance, volume, 
and novelty effects, swing would profit 
as a result. 

R. Lanman '39 



38 



THE PILGRIM 



Junior Poetry Page 



^iiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiimiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiimiiiuiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiim^ 



I BEAUTY 

| Delicate fragment, thing of the past, 

| Once a part of God's loveliest flower, 

I Once delicately tinted blush-pink by the 

1 sun, 

2 Now only a petal wilted and gone. 

| Once softly caressed by the whispering 

| winds, 

5 Warmed by soft rays of the sun shining 

| down, 

| Strewn by the angels at God's throne in 

2 heaven, 

| Now, only a petal, wilted and gone. 

2 How like the roses are people we know, 

| Bathed in the glory of exquisite beauty, 

| Who stand out in a crowd like a torch in 

2 the night; 

| But eventually they must fade and go on. 

| So enchantingly lovely, words cannot de- 

2 scribe, 

| So regal, so dainty, a pei-fect creation — 

| But, beauty, too, like the loveliest rose, 

2 Is only a petal, soon wilted and gone. 

| Enis Capozucca '40 

'■am inniiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiHi ninn iiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiinuiiiimiiiiiuiiiini 



| QUIET AND PEACE? | 

| Shall intolerance and grief once more N 

E. Rend God's fair world from shore to shore? | 

I Shall rows on rows of crosses white 

I Be increased each day and night? | 

| Shall stalwart sons be torn from arms y 

= To cause brave mothers sore alarms ? = 

=, Shall wrong and evil then prevail = 

= And the peaceful home assail? £ 

E Shall only our young and strongest die § 

= In foreign lands to fall and lie? 3 

= Shall conquest won at such a cost | 

^ Be counted a victory or a loss? =. 

= 'Twould be long dreary decades after e 

5 Before we heard again the laughter = 

e Of happy, carefree man or child, = 

| Erasing the terror in eyes grown wild. | 

e Heaven forbid that carnage be wrought, = 

e May brotherly love and peace be sought. | 

5 May the "Man of Sorrows" once again = 

e By his teachings and precepts quietly reign. = 

i Virginia Sampson '40 | 

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| WITH APOLOGIES TO MACBETH | 

1 Is this a school-book which I see before me I 

= During my vacation? Come, let me throw | 

3 thee. E 

| I throw thee far, yet 'tis not far enough. = 

| Art thou not, terrible book, wise enough | 

| To know I want thee not? Or art thou just | 

1 Trying to remind me of days to come, = 

| When I must study from thy pages ? | 

5 I see thee yet, as on that day e 

| When I last turned thy leaves. = 

= Thou showest me the way to better learn- e 

1 in s; . I 

= A.nd also giveth me a lot of pain. = 

| Mv thoughts affect my conscience, when I | 

| think | 

= Of unfinished homelessons. I see thee still; = 

i And in thy pages work I should have | 

g learned, = 

E But about which I am ignorant. ~ 

I Elizabeth Covell, '40 | 

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BUT THAT IS LIFE! 

Some people are rich, 
Some people are poor; 
And whichever they are 
They still long for more — 

But that is life! 
A piece of bread 
A place to sleep in 
A moment to smile 
And an hour to weep in — 

But that is life! 
A gill of joy 
A pint of trouble 
With a single laugh 
The worries come double — 

But that is life! 



M. Roncarati '40 I 



WINTER'S RETREAT 

The snow falls slowly on the hills, 

Cov'ring the earth with blanket white, 

The evergreen its branches fills 

With drifting flakes, and thus it makes 

A cape to foil the chilly night. 

Then comes the rain in torrent wild. 
That drenches all the world around; 

And where the snowscapes once beguiled, 
The month of May will bring some day 

A counterpane to hide the ground. 

Caroline Russell '40 



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THE PILGRIM 



39 




40 



THE PILGRIM 



A STUDENT'S SOLILOQUY 

*With apologies to Mr. Shakespeare 
and lovers of his works 

To study, or not to study; that is the 
question ; 

Whether 'tis worthwhile in the mind to 
suffer 

The verbs and adverbs of outrageous 
grammar, 

Or to take arms against a sea of equa- 
tions, 

And by slaving solve them? To go; to 
stay; 

No more, and by a stay to say we end 

The heartache and the thousand paren- 
tal shocks 

That marks are heir to; 'tis a consum- 
mation 

Devoutly to be wished. To go; to stay; 

To stay ; perchance to learn. Yes, there's 
the rub, 

For in that work of school what 
thoughts may come 

When we have postponed this present 
wish 

Must give us pause. There's the respect 
that makes calamity of so long 
study — 

For who would bear the x's and y's of 
math, 

The dramatist's pun, the poet's blank 
verse, 

The plots of despised plays, the book re- 
ports, 

The experiments of science and the 
"nons" 

That the student struggling with 
French takes 

When he himself might his appraisal 
make 

With mere dishonesty? Who would 
amusements miss 

To read and frown and read again, 

But that the fear of life lacking know- 
ledge, 

The undiscovered future for whose 
needs 

Mortals must prepare, puzzles the will 

And makes us firm to bear the studies 
at hand 

To be ready for a world we know not 
of? 

Thus conscience does make students of 
us all ; 

And thus the native hue of negligence 

Is colored by a wiser cast of thought, 

And enterprises of great use and learn- 
ing 

With this regard their currents turn 
toward, what? 

And gain the name of action. 

Madeline Baker '39 



LETER UV A REEL AMERIKUN 

Box 24 

Peters June. 

Ariz. 

July 2, 19 



Deer Jim 

I herd that you aint doin so bad in the 
east in the stok and bond biznes. I gess 
thers plenty of muny in it if yer smart. 
Wal gess wat hapened heer this week 
Joe Spooners in the jug. He gut arested 
3 days ago by the sherif and his depites 
heers the story. Joe he was out ridin last 
Wensdy and he wuz felin prity good 
gess mebby to much alky fer his on good 
anyway Joe wuz ridin along bowt 12 
therty at nite wen he sudinly cum on a 
bunch uv felers arownd a fir. They 
dident lok so good kinda tuf I gess but 
anyway Joe he dont go rit up to them 
but hangs bak lik so he can see wat ther 
up to but they kant see him. Wal thes 
bukos is tawkin to lo fer Joe to heer so 
he bein pikeld sneeks up closer to the fir. 
He heers wun gy say lissen you felers 
as soon as Lem cums bak wel get goin 
if hes gut good nooz and get them 
skunks befor they kin stop us frum get- 
in them catel. Yep sez anuther we gutta 
moov fast if we want them sters becuz 
them onery polcats wil get to the ralrod 
by termorer if we dont get em. By this 
time Joes beginin to wunder wat its al 
abowt and he ejes closer to the gang sos 
to cech evry werd jest now a gy cums 
ridin up from the uther sid uv the fir 
from Joe and Joe gesses its Lem. Shur 
enuf its him cuz he says helo boys fork 
yer kyuses Lefty Jons x bar o owtfit is 
camt on the rij over Snak Creek and we 
kin sneek up on em eezy and serpriz em 
and get them catel. So thes felers 
gets on ther bronks and heds likity 
larup for Snak Creek and leevs Joe 
layin in the bushez wunderin wat to do. 
Thes felers must be up to no good thinks 
Joe so Joe sets down to think things 
over. Lik I tol yew Joe is under the 
wether so he dont no much abowt wat 
hes doin wal he gets the idee that he 
wuz gonna be a herow sort uv so of he 
goes on his hoss and hes gut a fast hoss 
so it dont tak him long to put hisself be- 
tween the crooks and the x bar o boys 
and Lefty Jons. Joes never herd uv this 
gy Jons but hes a feler from up noth 
bringing his catel to the Feniks market 
and thes uther felers is gonto hook 
Lefty so lik I sez Joe is now in the midel 
of the ruslers and Snak Crek and he 
plants hisself behin the big rock on the 
tral war behin him he seez the x bar o 



THE PILGRIM 



41 



boys arownd a camfir and thers plenty 
uv catel to. Wal Joe jes gets seteld good 
wen arownd the bend cums this bunch 
with the Lem feler in the leed so Joe 
grabs his siksguns and lets em hav sum 
hot led and thes crooks divs ofn ther 
hosses and maks fer cuver likity split 
and begin firm bak at Joe but hes prity 
wel pertekted so he dont get hert but 
keeps these felers of at a distuns. It 
aint long befor the x bar o boys heers 
the raket and bein wid akwak they taks 
ther catel and gits befor the crooks kin 
finaly driv Joe bak. By this tim Joe gets 
lo on amunishun and haz to vakat his 
cuver kwit rapidlik but by this tim the 
owtfit is gon and Joes foyld the ruslers. 
Wal Joe rids bak to town I fergut to say 
Joe gut a bulit in his lift arm but he 
wuznt hert bad so he eezy mad it bak. 
Wal he wuz stil a litel under the in- 
fluens wen he gut bak but as soon as he 
gets pachd up he goz around town telin 
how he stopd a big gang uv ruslers 
frum stelin a bunch of catel and he uv 
cors maks it floury as he kin and it aint 
long befor the story is al over town. Wal 
Joe is jest cralin into bed abowt 7 thet 
moning and ther is a lowd nok on hiz 
dor and in cums the sherif and his dep- 
utes wal thinks Joe they want me to tel 
my story and mebby identifi them 
crooks so Joe he starts to tel al abowt 
it but the sherif shets him up rit away 
and without telin him what the hoi 
things abowt taks Joe of to the jug Joe 
notisin thet the sheriff has gut wun arm 
in a sling but not sayin nuthin. Wal 
finaly Joe wen hes sober enuf to no wats 
goin on wants to no watthe big idee is in 
kepin him in the hoosgow. Wal from the 
way the sherif aks Joe begins to think 
hes gonna linch him but he dont find 
owt nuthin til hes brung up fer triul 
befor Juj Medos then he learns the hoi 
story. It seems thet wat Joe thot wuz a 
bunch of crooks wuz rely the sherif and 
his possy and they wuz owt after the 
reel crooks this Lefty Jons x bar Outfit 
hoo had stole sum catel frum the serkl 
K ranch. The sherif and his possy wuz 
already to mak the kech wen Joe gut in 
the way and befor he wuz throo the 
ruslers from the X bar o hed gut away. 
Joes ben convikted on a charj uv drunk- 
nes cuz if he hednt ben soked he wood 
uv rekonizd the sherif and hes sentensd 
to 6 mos. but he dont mind cuz the hoi 
town is lafin up ther sieves at the 
sherif. Wal if anythin els hapens in this 
berg il writ you. 

Yoors trooly 

Crosyd-Cal Cattnipp 



P. S. Yer ant Abigail is sik and wants 
yew to send sum Kilarnys Kanded Kur 
for Katar and some pankiler. 
C. C. 
Nahum Morse '39 



WHY THE DOG'S NOSE 
IS ALWAYS COLD 

Years and years and years ago, 

How many I don't really know, 

There came a rain on sea and shore — 

Its like was never seen before. 

Unceasingly the rain came down 

The wicked, heedless world to drown. 

But just before it began to pour 

An old, old man — his name was Noah — 

Built him an ark, that he might save 

His family from a watery grave. 

And in it also he designed 

To shelter two of every kind 

Of beast. Now when the ark was done 

And heavy clouds obscured the sun, 

Into the ark the family ran 

And then the animals began 

Gravely to march along in pairs, 

The leopards, tigers, wolves, and bears, 

And hundreds more — 'twould take all day — 

But right at the procession's end 

A dog walked — man's most faithful friend. 

The livelong time he'd helping been 

To drive the crowd of creatures in, 

And now with loud, uproarious bark, 

He gaily sprang aboard the Ark. 

Alas! So crowded was the space 

He could not therein find a place; 

So patiently he turned about, 

Stayed halfway in and halfway out, 

And those extremely heavy showers 

Descended through nine hundred hours. 

Sad to relate — before their close 

Quite frozen was his honest nose, 

And never could it lose again 

The dampness of that dreadful rain. 

Olga Montali '40 



A SOLILOQUY ON CASH 

To spend or not to spend, — that is the prob- 
lem; 
Whether it would be easier on my pocket- 
book 
To forego the output of another dime, 
Or to splurge with my remaining coppers, 
And delight in spending them. To drink — to 

guzzle, — 
No end; and by these guzzles to arrest 
The thirst and craving for the milkshake 
That every boy is heir to_, — 'tis a question 
Difficult to decide. To drink, — to gulp, — 
To guzzle! Perchance to order another! 

There's the catch, 
For with that second order such a bill will 

come, 
When I have drained the last remaining 

drop, 
That I must gasp; I'll hoaid my gold. 

Paul Douglas '39 



RAINSTORM 

The street is shining, gleaming, wet, 
Gutters filled with a muddy stream; 
A street-light sheds an eerie glow 
As driving rain bedims its gleam. 
The trees are bent, but swaying stand 
Rooted firm 'gainst the downpour's force. 
The gusts of wind blow fiercely as 
The storm pui-sues its slashing course. 

B. Coleman '39 



THE PILGRIM 




A TREE IN THE SUN 

Above the ancient cobblestones 

That sharply lined the winding road, 

The sun had spun a brilliant web 

And pieced it with prismatic tones 

That gloried in their grand abode. 

And just the brush of time had lent 

The musty charm that filtered through, 

But at one side a shadow fell; 

And over it was gently bent 

A lovely tree known but to few'. 

The coolness from its leafy hands 

Dripped down while all its branches swayed, 

And people blindly passed it by — 

While on a desert's burning sands, 

A heat-racked man asked God for shade. 

Ella Vitti '39 



HURRICANE 

The wind that grey September day 

Held sway o'er land and seas, 
His word was law and all obeyed; 

He breathed, and bent the trees. 

His toll he took of living things, 

For one day he was a king; 
Where men had worked long years, one 
hour 

For him won everything. 

But once more man has won his war, 

The ruin soon was cleared — 
He overthrew the wind's wild rule; 

His spirit domineered. 

Lydia Brewster '41 




THE PILGRIM 



43 



"MIRROR, MIRROR ON THE WALL—" 

The man gazed at the crystal glass, 

His face was haggard — grim, 
Despair etched the sallow cheeks, 

"You're still a failure — Jim." 

She saw her mirrored image, too, 
But pleased was she — and proud, 

Though golden hair was all she had, 
"I'll keep it so," — she vowed. 

The baby stared with large, brown eyes, 

Then gave a startled cry, 
"How could I see another one 

Who looks the same as I?" 

A piece of glass reveals the truths 

We sometimes try to hide, 
How fine to meet its steady gaze 

With fearlessness and pride. 

Harriet Longhi '39 



THE RETURN 

"(ZOSH, school certainly gets on my 
nerves. It's always the same rou- 
tine, day in and day out. Nothing to 
break the monotony. What we need is 
a little excitement, something different 
to do besides going to school. There isn't 
any excitement at all in this burg." 

"That's just how I feel about it. Life 
isn't any fun if you're in a rut. You 
have to loosen up once in a while and 
have a little fling." 

This brief bit of philosophy was ex- 
pressed by Pat Murphy and Joe Wink- 
ler, mifteen^year-old sophomores who, 
now that they had thought about grow- 
ing up, were disgusted at the slow pace 
at which their town moved. Moreover, 
spring was in the air and wanderlust in 
their hearts. 

Pat and Joe were rather tall for their 
age, well-built, and not bad to look at — 
good specimens of healthy boyhood. Of 
course, they were not at the head of their 
class, but neither were they at the foot. 
As they went up the school steps, they 
were talking about the possibility of a 
trip to Boston that day to see what they 
considered the "big city". Since it was 
only 7:35 A. M., they could easily make 
the train and get to see the swell show 
playing at the Met. Putting their books 
away without opening them, they start- 
ed to translate their plan into action. 
"Why not?" asked Joe. 
"Okay ! Let's go," responded Pat en- 
thusiastically. 

Hurrying down across the school 
playground, they went along the water- 
front and up to the railroad station 
where the Boston-bound train stood puf- 
fing and snorting. 

But what of our two adventurers? 



No two boys of their description passed 
into the Metropolitan or were seen on 
Boston Common! 

Back in the little town of Waterbury 
calmly sitting in their seats in the aud- 
itorium with the rest of the school at 
the 8:05 assembly were Pat and Joe 
listening to Mr. Long announce that Mr. 
Johnson, the school principal, would not 
be there for the day, since he had taken 
the 7:45 train to Boston to attend a 
Teachers' Conference! 

Pauline Freyermuth '41 



SUGGESTION 

^HEN the leaves began to rustle, I 
could hear the hustle-bustle of the 
city, with its banging and its trolley 
cars all clanging. I could hear the city's 
noises, and I heard the drivers' voices 
as their horns were blowing louder and 
the girls with paint and powder ran to 
boys with slitty faces who appeared 
from darkened places, driving stolen 
cars with madness and I turned away 
with sadness from this evil habitude. 

L. Bradford Morton, Jr. '40 



ONWARD 

God, let not our courage fail — 

Let truth, hope, faith, and love prevail: 

As down the mystic roads ahead 

We walk with proud, uplifted head. 

When obstacles impede our way 

And sorrows seem to dim all joy — 

When skies above are dull and gray, 

May these not all our hope destroy 

But rather give us fortitude 

To overcome an interlude 

And find the course to happiness. 

Now that one goal has been attained 

We see before us rise 

A gate — wide open, luring 

To some great enterprise. 

Tis not the end we've reached at all; 

There yet is much to learn — 

Guide us on the right road, Lord, 

When we know not where to turn — 

As down the mystic road ahead 

We walk with proud, uplifted head! 

Oh, lead us onward with a song! 

Shirley Goldsmith 



HIS WILL 

It is His will that it should be so, 
That those we love the most should go 
Up there with Him where all is peace, 
And all their earthly troubles cease. 

Perhaps He needs them more than we, 
Perhaps if we could only see 
Them once again up there with Him, 
The tears no more our eyes would dim. 

His will is done and they are gone 

But some day when there comes the dawn, 
Our loved ones once again we'll meet, 
And then we'll find our joy complete. 

Lillian Coggeshall '40 



44 



THE PILGRIM 



Sophomore Poetry Page 



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ROADS 

One road leads to London, 
One road leads to Wales, 
And one road leads down 

a darkening slope — 
'Tis the road of the man 

who fails. 

But one road leads to 

hilltops, 
To fame we can all possess — 
A road worn hard by 

footsteps — 
The road that leads to success! 



SPRING'S ARRIVAL | 

The air is clean and sweet as after rain, 1 

The birds have all burst forth in joyful § 

song; . | 

The heart of man is filled with nameless | 

joy I 

As all the world acclaims the first spring s 

day. | 

The flowers bravely grope to find the light = 

As velvet grass makes carpets for the feet; 5 

Green leaves return to trees long unadorned, = 

As God inspects his handiwork. = 

Dorothy Morton '41 = 



= Joan Benson '41 = 
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REVELRY 

The witches on broomsticks 

Ride up the sky, 

The bats in gi-eat haste 

Go whirring by. 

Droll faces of lanterns 

Through windowpanes peep 

To keep frightened youngsters 

From going to sleep. 

The ghost in the attic 

Just waits and moans, 

While the skeletons frolic 

By rattling their bones. 

'Tis the eeriest night 

I ever have seen, 

Without doubt you can guess 

It's Hallowe'en. 

Elenore Hall '41 



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THE PASSING STORM | 

The sun that once had shone so bright 

Was veiled by clouds as black as night. | 

Great waves now lashed the distant shores | 

And filled the air with thundering roars. | 

Small boats were dashed against the docks, | 

And even more were crushed by rocks. 

The storm raged long into the night | 

With all its fury and its might. | 

Then far above, the earth was seen | 

The moon which cast its silvery sheen. | 

Betty A. Whiting '41 | 



MY PUP 

Blessings on thee, little pup, 
With thy pointed ears pricked up, 
And thy nose close to the ground 
Sniffing trails without a sound; 
Barking joyfully at play, 
Sleeping at the close of day. 
How I wish that I were thee, 
Carefree pup of ebony, 
Running gayly for a ball 
And coming quickly when I call. 



Eugenia Morse '41 n 



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THE PILGRIM 



45 




ACTIVITIES 



THE TALK OF THE SCHOOL 

Assembly Activities 

A BRONZE Plaque was presented to 
the school by the members of the 
local Legion on October 11th. It is in- 
scribed with the names of the alumni of 
Plymouth High School who served their 
country during the World War. 

Cartoonist Pitt Parker cleverly held 
the attention of all as he drew scenes of 
rare beauty or humor on October 18th. 
Whether the paper was upside down or 
not, there was no difference in the 
quality of the drawing. 

Lieutenant-Governor Horace J. Ca- 
hill addressed a combined audience of 
Senior and Junior High pupils to com- 
memorate Armistice Day. This was Mr. 
CahilPs first appearance after his elec- 
tion to the office. 

Thanksgiving Day was observed in 
assembly with an appropriate talk by 
Dr. Edgar R. Jones. 

"Caveman" Russell Paul Neville on 
November 29th carried us far from Pil- 
grim Plymouth into the Stygian dark- 
ness of caves by means of an illustrated 
lecture. Mr. Neville was an intimate 
friend of the late Floyd Collins. 

Christmas Spirit was aroused by the 
reading of poems by Mr. Shipman and 
selections by our own orchestra on 
December 22nd. 

Snakes of all sizes, shapes, and de- 
scriptions elicited gasps from the fem- 
inine spectators at the lecture of Mr. 
Jack Raymon on January 24th. Mr. Ray- 
mon, like Mr. Frank Buck, believes in 
"bringing 'em back alive." 

Future Orators started their climb 
on the ladder to fame on February 13th. 
The subject of this contest sponsored by 



the American Legion pertained to the 
Constitution of the United States. 
Gerald Ziegengeist was awarded the de- 
cision of the judges. To represent Plym- 
outh High School, Gerald entered the 
district contest in Middleboro, and, hav- 
ing been declared the winner, spoke in 
the zone contest in Brookline on March 
19th. 

Characters from Dickens and Shakes- 
peare lived for us again through the im- 
personations of Mr. George Pearson. 
This assembly, on February 19th, was 
another in the Pitt Parker series. 

Foreign Relations were clarified by 
the excellent lecture by Professor J. 
Antone De Haas from the Harvard Uni- 
versity School of Business Administra- 
tion. His unusually interesting exposi- 
tion was made possible by the efforts of 
members of the International Corres- 
pondence Club, who financed this pro- 
ject. 

Demonstrations were given on March 
15th by Miss Pearl Young on an unusual 
instrument, the theramin. Other novelty 
acts were offered on the electric guitar 
and the piano. 

The Schauffler Choir of Cleveland, 
Ohio, sang religious numbers, a cappella, 
to an appreciative audience on March 
23rd. 

Good Friday was commemorated by 
the combined efforts of the Senior Speak- 
ing Choir and the Girls' Glee Club. The 
accompaniment of Mrs. Mitchell on the 
Hammond organ, Easter lillies, and the 
impressive church windows proved 
beautiful additions. 

Mr. Tchyi Hsieh, with bits of phil- 
osoohv and wit and most interesting and 
reliable information, depicted the life in 
the Orient today. His prophecy for the 
future of China and Japan, given on 
April 12th, was most interesting. 
Happy Host 

"The Pilgrim" entertained delegates 
from the Southeastern Massachusetts 
League of School Papers on October 
19th. Following the "Departmental 
Clinics," Olympic Meets were held in the 
gymnasium and auditorium respec- 
tively, where prizes were awarded to the 
most skilled athlete and the best-in- 
formed participant. In the evening, 
Max Grossman, Professor of Journal- 
ism at Boston University, with "Get- 
ting the News" as his subject, shared 
honors with Gordon Smith, a cartoon- 
ist on the "Boston Post." 

Blackened Faces, lilting voices, and 
nimble feet delighted the patrons of 



46 



THE PILGRIM 



P. H. S. — Capades, the high school min- 
strel show. Both teachers and pupils co- 
operated with the coach, Mrs. Harriet 
Crocker, and with Miss Kelly, the 
teacher chairman, to make it a huge suc- 
cess. 

Frolicking Feet 

The Seniors sponsored the first dance 
of the year on October 21st. In a gay 
Hallowe'en atmosphere, Bernard Lor- 
ing furnished the rhythms for the 
swingsters. 

Football Heroes climaxed their sea- 
son with a sports dance on November 
12th, to prove that they can kick their 
feet as well as the pigskin. 

Rollerskating during intermission in- 
creased the profits of and the interest 
in the Double L Dance, sponsored by the 
Latin classes and library clerks. 

Upperclassmen and underclassmen 
alike attended the Sophomore Hop on 
March 31st, to swing and sway the Joe 
Correa way. 

Reverence Rendered 

"Out of the East", a cantata presented 
by the glee clubs with Miss Beatrice 
Hunt and Mr. Bruno Zangheri as solo- 
ists, demonstrated what can be done by 
willing workers. The beautiful church 
windows made by students under the 
supervision of Miss Dowling created a 
fine background for fine music. 

Madeline Baker 
Helen Hamilton 



FIRST IMPRESSIONS 

PROFESSOR Foullk, teacher of Eng- 
lish in a large New York high school, 
strode briskly down Park Avenue look- 
ing eminently satisfied with himself. He 
smiled graciously at the world and be- 
lieved that each and every inhabitant 
of it beamed back at him. The reason 
for his pleasant mood was apparent to 
those who had attended his lecture to 
the entire student body earlier in the 
day. 

To the youthful audience he had 
spoken volubly on the subject of appear- 
ance. He had dwelt especially on the 
fact that first impressions were always 
important, and had illustrated his 
point by offering several examples from 
the sheaf of notes on the table before 
him. His fellow teachers had nodded en- 
couragingly, and he had received many 
pleasant comments after the assembly. 

Suddenly his attention was attracted 
by a small boy vainly endeavoring to 
keep an English bulldog, the fiercest- 
looking Professor Foullk had ever seen, 
from breaking a rather fragile leash. 



The little fellow was really fighting a 
losing battle as the dog was fully as 
large as the boy himself. The animal, 
busy as it was, was definitely looking at 
something. Its gaze became intent and 
Professor Foullk glanced nervously 
about him. There was no one very close. 
Then he was the interesting object that 
had attracted the bulldog's attention. 
The thought galvanized the teacher in- 
to action. At this precise moment the 
strain on the leash told. They were off ! ! 
Professor Foullk's long, lean legs flew, 
his hand clutching at his derby hat, and 
the bulldog following at a tireless gait 
somewhere between a run and a waddle. 
The few on the street had now stopped 
and were engaged in cheering on one or 
the other, or in making bets as to the 
outcome. 

The teacher, however, had rarely en- 
gaged in sports and the pace was begin- 
ning to tell. The distance between the 
two lessened and the professor, real- 
izing this, abandond the derby and put 
extra effort into running. Truly, Pro- 
fessor Foullk, stripped of his dignity 
and nearly exhausted, deserved pity — 
if one could stop laughing long enough, 
At last the professor gave up and, with 
a prayer on his lips, fell exhausted to 
the ground. A shiver passed through his 
frame as he saw approaching the fat, 
white body with bloodshot eyes and fer- 
ocious, protruding teeth. Then he shut 
his eyes and hoped that the beast would 
at least make the end come quickly. 

The next instant the dog was upon 
him. A moment later he felt a sand- 
paper-like tongue pass over his face. He 
opened his eyes and tried to adjust his 
mind to the fact that the dog was prac- 
tically devouring him with kisses. 

The professor was not at his best 
when he conducted his English class the 
following day. Moreover, he did not 
choose to lecture on personal appear- 
ance or first impressions until the time 
came when he could laugh at the way 
in which he had been deceived. 

Dorris Bliss '40 



MANHATTAN 



The shrieking- of a million horns, 

The elevated's rumbling; 

The drama of six million lives, 

The taxis' endless grumbling. 

The glitter of a million lights 

That fill the night with splendor; 

While music gives the dancing crowds 

The thrill of sweet surrender. 

The tinkling of bright melodies 

On Broadway's incandescence; 

The rabid turmoil of Times Square, 

The marquees' opalescence. 

R. Raymond '39 



THE PILGRIM 



47 




T-JEAR ye! hear ye! this court will 
please come to order. Judge Sour- 
puss will preside today at the trials of 
the various school publications of South- 
eastern Massachusetts. 

The cases on the docket for today are 
the Exchange Editors of P. H. S. versus 
the "Periscope" of Bridgewater, "The 
Independence" of Kingston, "The Ab- 
his" of Abington, "The Sachem" of 
Middleboro, "The Partridge" of Dux- 
bury, and the "Oracle" of Randolph. 

Gentlemen of the jury, you have care- 
fully considered the contents of these 
various publications, and have thought- 
fully weighed their contents. What is 
your verdict? 

We, the jury, find the "Periscope 
guilty of a very witty and meaty mag- 
azine. We suggest that the court show 
no mercy to the Prudence Heartbreak 
column and sentence it to life imprison- 
ment in the "Periscope." 

The "Independence" is guilty of a 
very attractive cover design for the 
Christmas issue, but we recommend 
that the court banish the Humoresque 



jokes (Christmas issue) for the rest of 
their unnatural lives. 

We seek further investigation of the 
alumni issue of the "Abhis" to deter- 
mine why the Plymouth game (foot- 
ball) was not given a write-up, said 
omission having caused considerable 
conjecture in local sports' circles. 

The "Sachem" we find guilty of har- 
boring fine cartoons and pictures in 
a handy-sized booklet. 

The "Partridge" is hereby found 
guilty of a very clever "chatter" column, 
written in a snappy style. We therefore 
recommend its sentence to Alcatraz to 
prevent possible escape, (graduation 
issue) 

The French section of the "Oracle" is 
hereby sentenced to ninety-nine years 
imprisonment in the columns of said 
magazine. A similar sentence is hereby 
pronounced on the very attractive pic- 
tures which have served as accessory to 
the dubious crime of making this issue 
a very superior publication. 

Court adjourned until next year. 




CHEER LEADERS 

Richard Tubbs, Charlotte Whiting, Robert Drew, Jane Holmes, Thomas 
Pimental 



48 



THE PILGRIM 




THE PILGRIM 



49 



EXCERPTS FROM THE DIARY 

OF A P. H. S. STUDENT 

pOR the benefit of those alumni who 
may be interested in the activities 
and whereabouts of their former class- 
mates, I am opening my diary to the 
pages dated at the time of the Spring 
Vacation, for I have included notes on 
those alumni whom I happened to en- 
counter during that week. 

Sunday, March 19, 1939—1 was up 
early this morning to attend church ser- 
vices. On the way I was surprised to 
meet Dorothy Ziegengeist and Alice 
Riley, who were busily talking over 
their duties and experiences at St. Eliz- 
abeth's Hosptal in Brighton, Massachu- 
setts. Because the weather was so mild 
and beautiful, I took a walk in the after- 
noon. On passing Heywood's Filling 
Station I spied George Heath deeply en- 
grossed in the intracacies of a very flat 
tire. 

Monday, March 20, 1939— Blue Mon- 
day! Very dull day because of an im- 
pending storm. I ventured down to the 
library, however, to pass the time to 
some advantage. Carol Handy was oc- 
cupied in reading a special Bates edition 
of "Handy Hockey Hints," while not far 
away Barbara Peterson was engrossed 
in "The Technique of Early Rising at 
the University of New Hampshire." 
Elizabeth Anderson came in for some 
relaxation after a hard day's work in 
the Puritan Mill's Office. The walk was 
worth my while, after all, for it meant 
the renewal of old acquaintances. 

Tuesday, March 21, 1939— The first 
day of spring ! It is the kind of day that 
makes me glad to be alive. On leaving 
the house, I noticed going down the 
street a car bedecked with Boston Uni- 
versity banners, William Tedeschi at 
the wheel. I had my lunch at Parker's 
and looked up to see Francis Kritz- 
macher, who was demonstrating the 
Tufts technique of standing a glass of 
water on the edge of Thomas Jefferson's 
nose (on the new nickel) to Amedeo 
Gal rani, another Tufts student. (The 
demonstration itself proved disastrous.) 
After lunch. I toured the stores and 
caught a glimpse of Anna Riley pur- 
chasing a small notebook, which I imme- 
diately conceived to be for shorthand 
notes at the Chandler Secretarial 
School. 

Wednesday, March 22, 1939— Today 
I ran to a fire on the next street. Thomas 
Metcalf, home from Bryant College, was 
there with Alfred Pizzotti, who is con- 



tinuing his education at Springfield 
College. I read in the paper today that 
Wilfred Cohen is also a student there. 
To-night I went to the ball and met Dor- 
othy DeCost, who explained that she is 
attending a school in Brockton from 
which she will graduate with the ability 
to create the unusual in coiffures. 

Thursday, March 23, 1939—1 went to 
town to have the car repaired at Man- 
do's Service Station and was obliged by 
Robert Paoletti. He completed the work 
in time for me to meet the noon train 
from Boston. Three of last year's grad- 
uates, President Francis Scheid and 
John Tavernelli, not very fresh from a 
difficult term at Boston University, and 
Chester Parsons, who is vacationing 
from Northeastern, got off the train. As 
luck would have it, their path crossed 
that of three classmates, Donald Govoni, 
Curtis Lafayette, and Leo Roberge, who 
were on their way to lunch from the 
Puritan Mills. Warren Peck, Howard 
Smith, and Mario Regini are also work- 
ing there. 

Friday, March 24, 1939 — More 
alumni ! I saw Roland Holmes, who has 
just completed a term at Bowdoin, talk- 
ing to Spencer Breicster, who is at 
Governor Dummer Academy preparing 
for M. I. T. They had just seen John 
Darsch drive by in a Keller's Bakery 
truck and were remembering days at 
P. H. S. Helen Belcher, walking to a 
Scout meeting, nodded a greeting to 
them. She attends Mt. Holyoke. 

Saturday, March 25, 1939— Another 
perfect spring day! I had to go to Pil- 
grim Hall for some information and 
found Janet Broadbent, who is at North 
Adams State Teachers' College, Mary 
Cingolani, and Arnold Torrance home 
from Bridgewater. In the evening I 
went to the movies at the Old Colony 
Theatre and saw Edna Gunther, who is 
at Katherine Gibbs Secretarial School, 
and Annie Stein from Howard Semi- 
nary, talking to Evon Lee, who is em- 
ployed in the box office. 

Complimenting myself on such a busy 
and profitable week, I lay aside my 
diary until some future date when I may 
again be curious as to the activities of 
the Plymouth High School alumni. 



Quite Safe 
Mrs. Newrich — "You will be careful on 

my new polished linoleum, won't von. 

plumber?" 
Plumber— "Don't worry about me, lady. 

I won't slip. I've got hobnails in me 

boots." (Colgate Banter) 



50 



THE PILGRIM 



And That Was That 
Jenkins was stout, with large, broad 
feet, and although several pairs of shoes 
were shown him, he refused them. 

"I must have square toes," he explain- 
ed to the assistant. 

The young man sighed wearily. 
"But square toes are not stocked now, 
sir," he explained. "Pointed toes are 
fashionable this season." 

Jenkins gave him an angry stare. 
"That may be," he retorted, "but I 
happen to be wearing last season's feet." 

(Safe Driver) 
Cheaper 
Teacher — "What is the difference be- 
tween lightning and electric light?" 
Pupil — "Lightning is free." 

(Chicago Tribune) 

Don't Hesitate 
"Is this the Weather Bureau?" 
"Yes, sir." 

"How about a shower tonight?" 
"It's all right with me ; take it if you 

need it." (Boy's Life) 

Few and Far Between 
"Sammy," asked the teacher, "how 

many make a million?" 

"Not many," answered Sammy, quick- 
ly. (Indianapolis News) 
Make Sure 

Neighbor — "Is this your ball in my gar- 
den?" 

Boy — "Are there any windows broken?" 

Neighbor — "No, sonny." 

Boy— "It's my ball, then." 

(Chicago Tribune) 
Weather Forecast 

Scientist — "So you have followed the 
sea all your life! I presume you can 
easily foretell a gale, can't you?" 

Jack Tar — "Easy enough, sir. When you 
hear the captain yell out forty orders 
at once, you can make up your mind 
that it's going to blow!" 

(Tulsa World) 
SOS 
Little Bobby came into the house at 

noon looking very much distressed. 
"Mummy," he said, "is it true that an 

apple a day keeps the doctor away?" 
"Yes, my dear," replied his mother. 

"Why?" 

"Well, I've kept ten doctors away this 

morning, but I'm afraid one will have to 

come this afternoon !" (Omaha Bee) 

How Many Coats 

Young Alex (watching painter) — "How 
many coats of paint do you give a 
door?" 

Painter — "Two, my boy." 

Young Alex (brightly) — "Then if you 



gave it three coats it would be an 
overcoat?" 
Painter — "Yes, my lad, and a waste 
coat." (Seattle Post Intelligencer) 



BONERS— 
(Not that we claim them) 

A blizzard is the inside of a fowl. 

A buttress is a woman who makes 
butter. 

Genius is an infinite capacity for pick- 
ing brains. 

To germinate is to become a natural- 
ized German. 

A goblet is a male turkey. 

Mussolini is a sort of material used 
for ladies' stockings. 

An optimist is a man who looks after 
your eyes ; a pessimist looks after your 
feet. 

A refugee keeps order at a football 
match. 

A sinecure is a disease without cure. 

S. 0. S. is a musical term meaning 
same only softer. 

An epitaph is a short, sarcastic poem. 

Poetry is a thing you make prose of. 

Pope wrote principally in heroic cut- 
lets. 

An interval in music is the distance 
from one piano to the next. 

Mandolins are high officials in China. 

People go to Africa to hunt rhinos- 
triches. 

The equator is a menagerie lion run- 
ning around the earth and through 
Africa. 

Certain areas of Egypt are cultivated 
by irritation. 

Mushrooms always grow in damp 
places and so they look like umbrellas. 

Rhubarb is a kind of celery gone 
bloodshot. 

The pineapple is the fruit of the pine 
tree. 

Herrings go about the sea in shawls. 

Quinine is the bark of a tree; canine 
is the bark of a dog. 

A magnet is a thing you find in a bad 
apple. 

The earth makes a resolution every 
twenty-four hours. 

Caesar extinguished himself on the 
battlefields of Gaul. 

Magna Carta said that the King was 
not to order taxes without the consent 
of Parliament. 

In 1658 the Pilgrims crossed the 
ocean and this was known as Pilgrim's 
Progress. 

The chief executive of Massachusetts 
is the electric chair. 

No is the adverb of negotiation. 



THE PILGRIM 



51 




A COMMENDABLE SEASON 
()NE of the best football teams for 
many years represented Plymouth 
High School this past season. Under the 
leadership of Captain James Caramello 
the team was victorious in six out of 
nine games. Coaches Henry Knowlton 
and Mario Romano initiated the '38 sea- 
son with a stiff spring training session 
of six weeks. After the summer vaca- 
tion, practice again started on the first 



Next came the hardest and most 
looked-forward-to game of the season, 
Plymouth vs. Dedham. Dedham out- 
weighed our boys considerably, but 
Plymouth proved superior in a 14 — 7 
victory. MacDonald scored the first 
touchdown, Katchrjole of Dedham tied 
the score ; then Davey Furtado broke 
loose and went over for the winning 
touchdown. 

After this victory Plymouth won an 




FOOTBALL TEAM 
First Row: Alton Zaniboni, Solomon Shwom, Thomas Prentice, Alfred 

Babini, Gilbert Tavares, James Caramello, Alfred Darsch 
Second Row: Albert Cristani. Donald McDonald, Wendall Holmes, Joseph 

Farina, Walter Motta, David Furtado 



of September. 

The first game of the season was a 
victory of 12 — 7 over Hingham. 

On the next Saturday Plymouth met 
a tartar in Abington, but came out on 
top with a well-merited 13 — 12 victory. 
The game was Plymouth's first victory 
over Abington in six years. 

Rockland came down to Plymouth the 
following week with its best squad in 
years, but it was not good enough, for it 
was swamped 33 — 6. Sol Shwom will 
never forget this game, for it was he 
who scored the first touchdown when 
Captain Caramello kicked the ball into 
the end zone and Sol fell on it. 



unexpectedly tough battle with Bridge- 
water 13 — 0, and then toppled Middle- 
boro 20—0. 

Came the downfall ! After Plymouth's 
remarkable record, Whitman crushed 
its hopes for an undefeated season by a 
13 — victory. 

On the following Saturday, Wey- 
mouth won a close game 13 — 6, although 
Plymouth threatened many times dur- 
ing the third and fourth quarters with 
MacDonald's passes. 

The final game of the season was 
relayed against Saugus who won 13 — 7. 
It rained continuously that day and the 
field was covered with thick mud, which 



52 



THE PILGRIM 



was a handicap for both teams. Plym- 
outh scored an early touchdown on a 
pass from MacDonald to Darsh, who 
ran thirty yards for the goal. Plymouth 
held this lead until the fourth period 
when Saugus scored twice. 

We are, of course, sorry to have so 
many players graduating this year. We 
know we shall feel the loss of that spark 
plug of the backfield, Davey Furtado, 
and our pass receiver, Chippy Darsh, 
our blocking back, Albert Cristani, 
Captain James Caramello L. T., Thomas 
Prentice R. G., Sol Shwom R. T., and 
Wendell "Huck" Holmes whom we de- 
pended upon for a few extra yards for 
a first down. We expect four lettermen 
to return next year: Donald MacDonald, 
Captain-Elect Alfred Babini, Gilbert 
Tavares, and Alton Zaniboni, while 
there will be many good prospects com- 
ing up from the second team. 



OUR MIGHTY MIDGETS 

TPHIS year's basketball team has had 
an unusual season. The boys played 
fifteen games, of which they won nine 
and lost six. They began with a close 
victory over the alumni, then lost the 
next four games to Abington, Wey- 
mouth, Rockland, and Braintree. But 
their spirit and willingness to learn pre- 
vailed — and they defeated Hingham, 
East Bridgewater, Bridgewater, Brain- 
tree, Middleboro, Weymouth, and Ab- 
ington. The most exciting games of the 
season were at Weymouth, where we 



lost by one point, and with Hingham 
when we won by one point in Memorial 
Hall. 

Of course, the team was not through 
yet, for the boys entered the South 
Shore High School tournament at the 
Brockton "Y". In the first round they 
drew a bye. In the next they played 
Bridgewater. Although Bridgewater 
High School enjoyed something of a 
picnic in the first eight minutes of play 
and led 8 to 7 at the end of the first 
quarter, their joy was shortlived, for 
Plymouth defeated them. This victory 
sent Plymouth into the semi-finals to 
clash with Abington. 

Although Plymouth kept close to 
Abington during the first half, Abing- 
ton shot ahead with a lead which Plym- 
outh could not break. However, in this 
game we were handicapped by a small 
playing surface. The smaller the court, 
the greater the handicap for a team on 
which boys like Dave Furtado, Bev 
James, Tommy Ruggiero, Warren Gar- 
uti, and Bucky Freeman hardly top the 
5 foot 5 inch mark. And, of course, 
Coach Morey centered his team's activ- 
ities on checking Bev James. 

In the consolation game to decide 
third place in each division, Plymouth 
High unset Lawrence High of Falmouth, 
on Bucky Freeman's midfloor shot in a 
sudden death overtime period. 

This year we are losing four players 
from the starting lineup : Beverly James 
and Dave Furtado, forwards ; Joe Far- 
ina and Gilbert Freeman, guards. We 




BOYS' BASKETBALL SQUAD 
First Row: Gilbert Freeman, David Furtado, Alfred Darsch, Joseph Farina, 

Harold Rogers, Beverly James 
Second Row: Thomas Ruggiero, Donald McDonald, George Randall, Solomon 

Shwom, Thomas Prentice, Warren Garuti 



THE PILGRIM 



53 



are also sorry to lose Tommy Ruggiero 
and Alfred Darsch. But we still have 
four first-team players: Harold Rogers, 
center; George Randall, guard; Warren 
Garuti, forward; and Donald MacDon- 
ald, guard; as well as many promising 
second-team players. 



PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 
1938 Basketball Schedule 1939 



DATE 

Dec. 22 

Jan. 6 

Jan. 10 

Jan. 13 

Jan. 17 

Jan. 20 

Jan. 24 

Jan. 27 

Feb. 3 

Feb. 7 

Feb. 10 

Feb. 14 

Feb. 21 

Feb. 24 

Feb. 28 



OPPONENT 

Alumni 

Abington 

Weymouth 

Rockland 

Braintree 

Hingham 

Rockland 



OPPONENT 

38 
37 
42 
52 
38 
30 
50 



East Bridgewater 35 



Bridgewater 

Braintree 

Middleboro 

Hingham 

Bridgewater 

Weymouth 

Abington 



35 
31 
23 
36 
29 
24 
23 



H. s. 
40 
28 
41 
28 
34 
31 
26 
40 
49 
39 
39 
25 
47 
41 
35 



BROCKTON TOURNAMENT 

DATE OPPONENT OPPONENT P. H. S. 

Mar. 11 "Bye" 

Mar. 11 Bridgewater 26 42 

Mar. 11 Abington 54 39 

Mar. 18 Third Race Division 
Falmouth 35 



37 



PIVOT AND SHOOT! 



'J'HE girls began their basketball sea- 
~~ son by bringing home a victory from 
Oliver Ames. Then they proceeded to re- 
peat the performance and defeated all 
their opponents except Whitman. The 
loss of the Whitman game by only two 
points was a great disappointment to 
those who had resolved to go through 
this season undefeated. 

Phemie Gascoyne distinguished her- 
self for a second year with her remark- 
able shots. She has 156 points to her 
credit this season, and we expect that 
she will still continue to be of the same 
service to us next year. 

Of course one player does not consti- 
tute a team, and Betsey Drew, Lois 
Rovatti, Jane Holmes, Tillie Bussolari, 
and Virginia Weston deserve all the 
credit we can bestow upon them. 

Next year Mrs. Garvin will have only 
two regulars to work with, but many a 
time she has seen what practice will do 
for her possibilities. 

It is encouraging to note that in the 
foul-shooting contest Barbara Harlow 
made 30 foul shots while the boys' cham- 
pion, Bev James, got only 32. 



Once again we reluctantly store away 
the basketballs until next season, but 
for those of us who leave all this behind, 
the memory of our last season and the 
friendship of our coach will long re- 
main. 



Opponents 
North Easton 
North Easton 
Whitman 
Bourne 
Middleboro 
Alumnae 
Whitman 
Middleboro 



Place 
there 

here 

here 
there 
there 

here 
there 

here 



Ply. 
31 
31 
37 
31 
43 
31 
27 
23 



Opp. 
15 
20 
17 
16 
14 
21 
29 



NEVER SAY DIE! 

WITH a swish of a racket and whiz of 
a ball the girls' sport season began. 
Emily McEwen and Jane Holmes com- 
peted in the finals of the tennis tourna- 
ment. So evenly matched were the girls 
that not until two sets had been played 
did Emily win by a narrow margin. 

Next year's hockey season looks 
promising if we can judge by the scores 
attained by this year's seconds. They 
were never scored upon, winning five 
games and tying two. Barbara Harlow 
has been unanimously chosen to act as 
next season's captain. This year's sopho- 
more sport enthusiasts were a welcome 
sight to Mrs. Garvin, and with these 
newcomers we hope she will have an 
even more successful season next year. 

The first team forfeited only one 
game to Marshfield, tied two, and won 
five. We regretfully realize that all the 
first-team girls will graduate except 
two, Phemie Gascoyne and Lois Rovatti. 
We were duly proud, throughout our 
season, of the fine work of Tillie Busso- 
lari, our captain, and we shall miss the 
fighting spirit of Betsey Drew and our 
cold-blooded goalie, Brooks Barnes. We 
are equally sorry to lose Charlotte Whit- 
ing, Betty Coleman, Pudgy Weston, and 
Connie Addyman. It is true that the 
first team fell a trifle short of what Mrs. 
Garvin thought they could attain, — an 
undefeated season, but the seniors now 
leave to the juniors and sophomores the 
prospects of realizing this ambition 
next season. Never say die ! 



1938 Fiel 


d Hockey 


1939 
Ply. Opp. 


Middleboro 


there 


3 


Marshfield 


here 


1 


Scituate 


there 


1 1 


Middleboro 


here 


1 1 


Marshfield 


there 


2 


Bourne 


here 


3 


Scituate 


here 


2 


Alumnae 


here 


3 1 



14 



54 



THE PILGRIM 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL SQUAD 

First Row: Constance Addyman, Betsy Drew, Euphemia Gascoyne, Tillie 
Bussolari, Virginia Weston, Jane Holmes, Lois Rovatti 

Second Row: Eleanor Gardiner, Charlotte Whiting, Barbara Harlow, Eliza- 
beth Coleman, Mrs. Garvin, Emily McEwen, Barbara Kritzmacher, Lydia 
Brewster, Nancy Reagan 

Third Row: Antonette Rossetti, Dorothy Correa, Laura Paoletti, Ita Murphy, 
Virginia Sampsom, Mary Fernandes, Blanche Arruda, Dorris Bliss 




GIRLS' HOCKEY SQUAD 

First Row: Euphemia Gascoyne, Charlotte Whiting, Lois Rovatti, Brooks 
Barnes, Elizabeth Coleman, Tillie Bussolari, Betsy Drew, Jane Holmes, 
Virginia Weston, Constance Addyman, Antonette Rossetti 

Second Row: Dorothy Correa, Dorothy Jesse, Virginia Sampson, Gloria 
Seaver, Emily McEwen, Elizabeth Dupuis, Ita Murphy, Agnes Barlow, 
Barbara Harlow, Martha Texeira, Mary Fernandes 

Third Row: Barbara Kritzmacher, Catherine Leonardi, Virginia Young, Mrs. 
Garvin, Laura MacLean, Frances Brown, Linda Longinotti 



THE PILGRIM 



55 




FOREIGN, 



LANGUAGES 



MA REVERIE 
J'entends les cloches 
La nuit s'approche 
Mais mon coeur est vide. 
Je t'ai trouve oomme un reve 

dans ma Reverie. 
L'amour est un reve mais dans ma 

Reverie 
Je peux voir que l'amour est tout fini. 
Seulement un pauvre fou n'a tourne 

dans une telle roue 
De romance qui est si douce 
Mais c'est tout fini. 
Mon reve ne vaut rien et sans ton 

sourire 
De quoi vivre et je pense a seulement 

mourir. 
Je t'aime. Ah je t'aime dans ma Reverie. 
Mais mon coeur ne sera rempli. 
Oui je le sais que c'est tout fini 
Et je vis dans ma Reverie. 




Sans doute vous direz a vous-meme — 
Ah, je sais qui a ecrit cette belle chan- 
son. C'etait Larry Clinton. Mais non, 
mes amis, vous avez tort. Cette chanson 
qui est tres populaire aujourd 'hui 
etait ecrite par un compositeur francais 
qui avait la reputation d'etre un homme 
insociable. Ses yeux etaient un peu 




etroits, ses cheveux noirs bouclaient 
legerement sur un front extremement 
haut. II parlait peu et souvent d'une 
maniere brusque; c'etait pour cette 
raison qu'il etait frequemment mal com- 
pris. Maintenant savez-vous qui est ce 
compositeur? Non? Je vous le dirai. 
C'est Claude Achille Debussy. C'etait 
celui qui a ecrit la composition "Ma 
Reverie". Ce compositeur unique est ne 
a Saint-Germaine-en-Laye en mil huit 
cent soixante-deux. Quand il n'etait 
qu'un petit garcon il jouait tres bien du 
piano. A l'age de onze ans, il s'est fait 
enregistrer dans le Conservatoire de 
Paris et a gagne le Grand Prix de Rome. 
Beaucoup de ses oeuvres sont bien con- 
nues. Peut-etre connaissez-vous son 
oeuvre dramatique la plus fameuse 
appelee "Pelleas et Melisande". Claude 
Achille Debussy est mort en l'annee mil 
neuf cent dix-huit. Maintenant, quand 
vous chanterez "Ma Reverie" pensez a 
ce compositeur qui bien qu'il soit peu 
oonnu, a donne beaucoup au monde avec 
sa belle musique. 

Eunice Santos '39 



UNE CLASSE EXTRAORDINAIRE 

Voila la classe de frangais. Le profes- 
seur est assis derriere son bureau et il 
a fait l'appel excepte un. 

Le Professeur: "Et enfin, Armand 
Boudouin." (Silence.) 

Le Professeur : "Armando — " 

Armand, (qui dormait et vient de se 
reveiller) : "Comment! Oh, ici." 

Le Professeur : "Ce n'est pas la classe 
de dormeurs, c'est la classe de francais. 
Si vous voulez dormir, allez vous 
coucher. Maintenant, Armand, avez- 
vous etudie le vocabulaire?" 

Armand: "Mais oui, Monsieur." 



56 



THE PILGRIM 



Le Professeur: "Alors, Armand, 
qu'est-ce qu'un homme porte autour de 
son cau?" 

Armand : "Ah-er-un-une-le-ah — ". 

Le Professeur: "Ne savez-vous pas?" 

Armand : "Mais oui, monsieur, l'hom- 
me porte un-er — " 

Le Professeur : "Eh bien, Armand, je 
ne pense pas que vous sachiez le vocab- 
ulaire. Ne savez-vous pas ce qu'un hom- 
me porte autour de son cou? Je sais que 
vous la portez toujours." 

Armand: "Oui, Monsieur, je le sais! 
C'est une femme!" 

Le Professeur : "Parbleu ! Vous etes 
un ane, Armand! C'est une cravate. 
Cependant, Jacques, traduisez un peu, 
la premiere phrase, s'il vous plait. La 
phrase est, 'Voiei l'Anglais avec son 
sangfroid habituel'." 

Jacques: "II veut dire, 'Here comes 
the Englishman with his usual bloody 
cold'." 

Le Professeur: "Mon Dieu, Jacques, 
etes-vous fou? Vous avez tort. Jean, tra- 
duisez cette phrase. 'Notre voisin est 
mort d'une congestion pulmonaire'." 

Jean: "Um-m-c'est dire, 'Our neigh- 
bor died in a crush in a pullman car'." 

Le Professeur : "Quelle sorte de tra- 
duction est cela? Vous n'avez pas fait la 
lecon, vraiment. Alors, Henri, vous 
etes mon eleve precieux. Que veut dire, 
'Cela va sans dire'." 

Henri : "Cela veut dire, 'It walks 
without talking'." 

Le Professeur: "Oh-h-Henri, et vous? 
Qu'avez-vous? Je serai fou si personne 
ne traduit correctement. Renaud, si 
vous m'aimez, traduisez bien, 'II recom- 
manda son ame a Dieu'." 

Renaud : "Ah-er-he-uh — " 

Le Professeur: "Venez, Renaud, tra- 
duisez tout de suite." 

Renaud: "He-he-uh-he said goodbye 
to his donkey." 

Le Professeur : "Oh, mon Dieu, — c'est 
trop! Je vais fou! Oh- oh-h — " (II 
s'evanouit) 

Nahum Morse '39 



quelqu'un qui sache le fondateur de cette 
ville magnifique?" 

Apres avoir hesite un moment un 
eleve plus alerte que les autres a repon- 
du nerement, "Saint Pierre!" 

Constance Addyman '39 



UN JEUNE HISTORIEN 
Dans la classe d'histoire de Monsieur 
Bagnall les eleves sont toujours intelli- 
gents et piquants. 

Un jour Monsieur Bagnall a com- 
mence a discuter la ville de Saint Pet- 
ersburg. II a parle de cette ville long- 
temps. II a explique que c'est une belle 
ville, tres propre et tres religieuse, la 
ville modele de cette periode. 

Apres une description complete il a 
demande a sa classe, "Est-ce qu'il y a 



UN ELEVE INTELLIGENT 

Cette scene se passa dans une classe 
d'histoire. Le professeur posait des 
questions aux eleves. II discutait des 
dates importantes dans l'histoire 
d'Amerique. 

"Quel evenement important s'est 
passe en 1824?" demanda-t-il aux eleves. 

Personne ne leva la main. Quelques 
moments passerent et le professeur con- 
tinua. 

"Mais vous le savez, — pensez. C'est 
un evenement tres important dans 
l'histoire de notre pays. II est impossi- 
ble a oublier. II est important a nous 
tous qui demeurons aux Etats-Unis." 

"Mais, oui, oui, je le sais," dit un 
eleve en agitant vigoureusement la 
main, "On a construit le Plymouth Cord- 
age en 1824." 

Christine Hogan '39 



UNE HISTOIRE VRAIE 

Un jour quand on faisait des photog- 
raphies des membres de notre classe, 
beaucoup de filles, en attendant le photo- 
graphe occupe, faisaient la queue. Parce 
que quelques-unes etaient la depuis 
deux heures, elles etaient tres desireuses 
de finir tout de suite. Une fille qui etait 
la prochaine a dit aux autres filles, en 
plaisantant : 

"On ne fera pas vos photographies, 
aujourd'hui." 

"Quoi !" se sont ecriees les filles tres 
inquietes. 

"Parce que je casserai l'appareil," a 
continue la fille avec un sourire. 

"Ah, sans doute," ont crie les autres 
filles riant. 

Alors la fille est allee derriere le ri- 
deau de la scene. 

Le photographe a fait seulement une 
pose de la fille, et alors il a dit aux 
autres filles: 

"II est necessaire que vous veniez 
encore parce que l'appareil est casse !" 

Et vous pouvez imaginer l'embarras 
de la fille, n'est-ce pas? 

Emily McEwen '39 
Devinez : — 

1. Un garcon avec un nom francais 
qui sait mieux la chimie que la langue 
francaise. 

2. Ce briseur des coeurs feminines 
qui est un gamin appelle "Wash-Yur 
Windshield". 



THE PILGRIM 



57 



3. Le "Rip Van Winkle" de 1'ecole 
mais qui joue bien au basketball. 

4. Le sage de P. H. S. qui sait non 
seulement les reponses mais aussi les 
questions. 

5. Pourquoi une fille avec le nom de 
Murphy s'appelle, "Scotty". 

6. La professeur qui arrete les eleves 
quand ils courent furieusement a leur 
dejeuner. 

7. Une fille dans la classe de francais, 
qui aime a vendre les billets. 

8. Un garcon qui aime a chanter les 
chansons ecossaises. 

9. Une fille qui est un tres bon artiste. 
10, Un professeur qui n'aime pas les 
taches d'encre sur son plancher. 

(Key on page 70) 

MOTS CROISES 




Horizontalement 

1. Street 

3. Low 

6. They (indefinite) 

8. Negative 

9. Queer, strange 

12. In, by, while (prep.) 

14. If (conj.) 

15. Laugh (n.) 

16. By or through 

Verticalement 

1. King 

2. One (masculine) 

4. Year 

5. Dry 

7. To have 

10. Sea 

11. Air 

13. Neither, nor 

14. His, her, its (f.) 



L/ITALIANO 

LA NOSTRA PRIMA 
CLASSE dTTALIANO 

La popolazione italiana del nostro 
paese, specialmente i genitori, e molto 
contenta perche quest'anno per la prima 
volta c'e la grand' opportunita d'impar- 
are 1'italiano nella scuola media. Per 
una tale fortuna bisogna ringraziare 
tutti quei cittadini che hanno lavorato 
cosi forte per questa causa. 

La nostra classe d'italiano non e sol- 
amente per gli studenti che hanno i gen- 
itori italiani ma anche per tutti coloro 
che desiderano di studiare la bella lin- 
gua. Essendo il primo anno che l'italiano 
e insegnato, la nostra classe non e molto 
grande. Essa e composta di ventidue 
studenti. Quattro di questi studenti, 
non sono italiani, uno e americano e uno 
e portoghese. C'e anche un greco e un 
ebreo. 

In un paese con tanti italiani ci dov- 
rebbero essere piu di ventidue studenti 
che s'interessassero nell'italiano. Non 
bisogna dimenticare che questa lingua 
sara insegnata nel futuro solamente se 
gli studenti e i loro genitori s'interes- 
sano di piu. 

Nella nostra classe noi impariamo a 
leggere, a scrivere, e anche a parlare 
l'italiano. Noi non studiamo solamente 
la grammatica ma anche la storia e la 
geografia. Queste materie sono molto in- 
teressanti specialmente lo studio delle 
regioni e delle loro citta. Quando la 
maestra parla di Milano, Venezia e 
Roma il mio desiderio di vedere l'italia 
diviene piu forte. Noi abbiamo imparato 
dove molti degli uomini famosi come 
Dante, Verdi, Michelangelo, Raffaelo e 
Garibaldi nacquero. La maestra parla 
spesso della loro vita e dei loro lavori. 

Senza dubbia la lingua italiana e 
molto utile. Gli studenti che hanno i 
genitori italiani possono goderla leggen- 
do coi loro genitori delle cose interes- 
santi dell' Italia. L'italiano e molto 
utile anche per coloro che desiderano di 
studiare per fare il medico e l'avvocato 
e specialmente per coloro che desiderano 
di fare 1'artista e il musicista. Tutti 
quelli a cui piacciono le cose belle devono 
studiare l'italiano perche l'italia e la 
terra dell' arte e della musica e anche 
perche questa e una delle piu belle lin- 
gue del mondo. 

Olga Stanghelli '40 
America, terra di fortuna 

(Questo piccolo racconto fu ispirato 
dalla canzone piemontese "Lo Spazza- 
camino".) 



58 



THE PILGRIM 



Tonio Andoli e nato nella citta di 
Piacenza vicino a Padova. II suo babbo 
e morto nell'anno 1901. Allora Tonio 
aveva due anni. Cinque anni dopo, il 
poverino perde la sua mamma. Non 
avendo nessuno parente, ha dovuto 
guadagnarsi il danaro per vivere. 

Divento spazzacamino. Camminava 
da una citta all' altra spazzando camini, 
ma non trovava sempre il lavoro. II 
poverino era molto triste. Spesso aveva 
fame, aveva freddo. II suo abito e la sua 
faccia diventarono neri ed egli era sem- 
pre sudicio. 

Un giorno del 1914, mentre il ragaz- 
zino camminava per le vie di Magenta, 
il signor Mendoli lo vide. A quest'uomo 
lo spazzacamino sembrava un ragazzo 
molto ambizioso. Egli gli diede da lav- 
orare. II lavoro era difficile, ma Tonio 
lavorava con piacere. Qualche anno dopo 
divento impiegato e riceveva cento lire 
per settimana. 

A quel tempo, egli comminciava a 
pensare d'andare all'America, la terra 
di cui ognuno parlava, e cosi rispar- 
miava tutto il danaro che guadagnava. 
In pochi anni aveva accumulato abba- 
stanza danaro per il viaggio e presto 
s'imbarco per questa cosi detta terra 
d'opportunita. Qui la fortuna fu molto 
propizia per lui, ma egli non dimentica 
mai che una volta era poverino, e 
quando vede i ragazzi poveri ma am- 
biziosi, egli prova sempre d'aiutarli. 

Lewis B. Morton Jr. '40 

Andiamo in Italia 

Molti stranieri viaggiano in Italia per 
ammirare le antichita della bella Roma 
che e nominata per le sue chiese, per 
esempio, la chiesa di San Pietro che e 
una delle piu belle del mondo e anche 
una delle piu famose perche la e dove il 
Papa da udienza speciale a chiunque e 
fortunato d'ottenerla. 

Adesso diro loro come devono vestirsi 
coloro che ottengono queste udienze. 
Devono presentarsi vestiti complet- 
amente in nero con colletto chiuso e 
maniche lunghe. I gioielli sono assolut- 
amente proibiti. Le signore devono co- 
prirsi la testa con veli di seta nera. Alia 
loro uscita possono cambiarsi in una 
delle anticamere. A chi visita San Pietro 
non possono sfuggire i soldati svizzeri, 
rimarchevoli per i loro uniformi orig- 
inali e pittoreschi. 

Lasciando da parte la chiesa di San 
Pietro, alt'ri edifizi d'interesse in Roma 
sono: il Colosseo, il Palazzo Reale e la 
basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore con le 
loro innumerevoli pitture ed i suoi mag- 
nifichi mosaici. 

Un altra citta che coloro che viaggi- 



ano in Italia devono vedere e Venezia, la 
quale impressiona tutti con i suoi canali, 
ponti, e le sue belle gondole special- 
mente d'ammirare nell'occasione del 
Carnevale di Venezia ove fanno gara 
chi pud adornare la piu bella gondola e 
chi pud indossare il piu originale cos- 
tume. Unica e la bellezza della piazza di 
San Marco con tutti i negozi di gioielli, i 
caffe di gran lusso, e le grandi candele 
clettriche che di sera sono illuminate. 

Ora parliamo un po' di Napoli che e 
nominata per la citta dell'allegria e del 
canto. II piu misero operaio non cam- 
mina se non canta ad alta voce. I napole- 
tani si svegliano al mattino, e s'addor- 
mentano alia sera col canto in bocca. 
Durante il giorno la citta e piena di 
organi che suonano continuamente, 
piena di donne vestite in costumi da 
pacchiane, e di venditori di fiori che 
vanno d'intorno con fasci di rose, gar- 
denie, e gelsomini profumati. Napoli e 
anche da vedersi per le sue bellezze in- 
cantevoli, Capri. Amalfi e specialmente 
il Vesuvio Bisogna vederla per ver- 
amente capire il detto : Vedi Napoli e 
poi muori ! 

Genevieve Patturelli '40 
Dopo il caffe 

La lettura che noi leggevamo quel 
giorno diceva che Andrea era andato a 
dar da mangiare ai polli. 
— Dov' e andato Andrea? — domando la 
maestra a uno studente. 
— Andrea e andato a mangiare i polli, — 
rispose il ragazzo. 

La maestra : Maria, usa la parola 
'orologio' in una breve frase. 

Maria penso qualche minuto e poi 
confondendo il verbo essere ed avere 
disse, — io sono un orologio. 

— Michelena, come si dice 'ticket' in 
italiano? — domando la maestra. 
— Ticketta, — rispose Michelena. 

George Moskos '40 

LATIN 

Charlie's Latin Lesson 
Two popular figures well-known to 
the American public are Charlie 
McCarthy and Edgar Bergen. Charlie, 
of course, being only a lad, requires ed- 
ucation, and Bergen endeavors to sup- 
ply this. Charlie doesn't take to school- 
ing exactly as a duck takes to water as 
the following incident shows. Bergen 
is giving a Latin lesson to Charlie and 
neither is faring very well. 

"Charlie," said Bergen, "I'm going 
to have you translate some sentences. 
These are reasonably difficult but I ex- 
pect you to handle them easily." 



THE PILGRIM 



59 



"Oh, sure, Professor Bergen, you 
know me." 

"Yes, Charlie, too well I fear. Now, 
here is a sentence from the "Aeneid." — 
"Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes." 

"Why-uh-er-the Greeks-uh-in time 
the Greeks ate iron doughnuts." 

"Charlie! Charlie you know better 
than that!" ejaculated Edgar, dismayed. 
"Here, try this one. It's easier — "Pax in 
bello." 

"Why-well-that-" Charlie stammered 
and stumbled. 

"Come, Charlie, that isn't hard," 
urged Bergen. 

"That means-uh-er — " Charlie groped 
in his mind for the meaning — "Free- 
dom from indigestion." 

"What shall I do with you?" Bergen 
demanded, angered because evidently 
Charlie had not studied the lesson. "You 
didn't study." 

"B-b-but I forgot that page," stut- 
tered the boy, hoping that some other 
sentence might be easier. 

"All right, try this one. It's also from 
the "Aeneid." 'Arma virumque cano.' 
This is a manly line." 

"Manly, huh? Well, now, let me think, 
what's manly about it? — It means-uh-a 
gun, a man, and a dog." 

"Oh, heavens, Charlie, you get worse 
and worse." Bergen was fast losing 
patience. "If you don't do better, you 
can't go to the movies tonight. Now I'll 
give you a short written exam, and if 
you fail, you'll remain at home and go 
to bed instead of out to the cinema." 

Bergen then handed Charlie a paper 
with five sentences on it. Sometime later 
Charlie passed it back. He looked at 
Bergen with an expression of doubt. 
'I hope Bergen is dumber than I think 
he is," thought Charlie. "Maybe he 
won't look at the paper." 

Bergen, however, carefully examined 
the sentences and then, rising quickly 
and picking up a ruler, went off toward 
Charlie's room with a dangerous look in 
his eye. Let us see what the paper con- 
tained. 
C. McCarthy, Esq. Latin (Ugh) 

1. Omnia est Gallia Romanis. (Ex- 
plain the meaning of this familiar 
phrase. ) 

This means that it is ominous that the 
Romans had so much gall. 

2. Pocta nascitur non fit. 

A poet is not fit to be born. 

3. Leges Romanorum bonae erant. 
The legs of the Romans were bony. 



4. Cave Canem! 
Beware! I may sing! 

5. Stant litora puppes. 

There stands a litter of puppies. 

Now, after reading the contents of 
this marvel, where do you think Charlie 
went that night? 

Nahum Morse '39 



Ode To Virgil 
0, Virgil, great author, worth the 

world's acclaim, 
Whose talents are well-known by all 

scholars near and far, 
'Twas Aeneas, was it not, who brought 

to you your fame? 
Was not this remote ancestor your truly 

guiding star : 
You tell of this brave prince, this 

dauntless chief of Troy, 
Who fought a gallant battle for that 
,city filled with strife, 
And fleeing from this place with father 

and small boy 
Escaped, but had forsaken his dear 

Creusa's life. 
You give a full description of Great 

Venus' son, 
Of his adventures on the sea beset by 

storms above; 
Of how, blown from his course, at morn- 
ing's rising sun 
He found himself at Carthage, a mark 

for Dido's love. 
He did not tarry long; the Gods sent 

him away, 
And at Hades, with Sibyl, he heard with 

inborn fears 
His people's fate proclaimed; but there 

he goes astray 
And lands in country Tiber, after seven 

toilsome years. 
Then Latinus, the king, had promised 

for his wife 
Lavinia, whom Turnus was to wed, 
And Turnus, in a duel, paid dearly with 

his life, 
And soon Aeneas died ; for the years 

had quickly sped. 
0, Virgil, great author, worth the 

world's acclaim, 
Your hero conquered all, in his lands 

abroad and far, 
'Twas Aeneas, was it not, who brought 

to you your fame? 
Was not this remote ancestor your 

truly guiding star? 

Emily McEwen '39 



Boners heard in Latin class : 

Postridie eius diei — After the death 
of the god. 

Cohors — A kind of shell-fish. 

Derelictus — A machine with which to 
lift. 



60 



THE PILGRIM 



Did you know that: 

Robert Briggs : Abnormis sapiens 

Ita Murphy : Suaviter in modo, sed f or- 

titer in re. 
Melquezideque Perry: Brutem fulmen. 
Joan Beever: Semper paratus. 
Gerald Ziegengeist: Mens sana in cor- 

pore sano. 
Edgar Mongan : Consequitur quod 

cumque petit. 
Janie Christie: Semper fidelis. 
Richard Tubbs : Occupari in multis et 

magnis negotiis. 
Virginia Weston : Varium et mutabile 

semper femina. 



Alphonse Gambini : Adulescens vere- 

cundus esse debet. 
Eunice Santos : Festina Lente. 
John Brewer : Nil Molitur inepte. 
Brooks Barnes : Negotiis par. 
Betsey Drew : Copia verborum. 
Louis Morton : Aut insanit homo, aut 

versus facit. 
Robert Lowry : Errare humanum est. 
Paul Douglas: Quis fallere possit am- 

antem ? 
Elizabeth Dupuis: Animus est in 

patinis. 
Parker Barnes : Equo ne credite. 
Nahum Morse : Homo integer. 




Ver 
Prima dies veris venit A. D. XII Kal- 
endas Apriles. Hoc est tempus anni quo 
omnia viridia convertuntur et multi 
flores florent. Brevi tempore folii ar- 
borum gemmare incipiunt et multae 
plantae ex solo germinant. E6 tempore 
humus solvit et quaedam viae sunt fere 
inviae. Anates et anseres postero mense 
par ere incipiunt. Etiam, juvenes ranae 
mox audiri possunt Eae juvenes ronae, 
quae in paludibus inveniuntur solis oc- 
casu canere incipiunt et in tardam noc- 
tem canere pergunt. Nunc brevi tempore, 
et multi populi febre veris adfligi et 
eorum studia propter hanc febrem 
minore cum indiligentia fieri incipient. 
Cum videbis ea signa, quae nuper mem- 
oravi, verem adesse nosces. 

Robert M. Briggs '40 



Dominus Me Regit 

Dominus est meus pastor : ergo nihil 
carebo. 

Me in viridibus agris pascet : et me ad 
aquas solatii educit. 

Meum animum renovat : et me in vias 
pietatis et sanctitatis producit, Eius 
Nominis causa. 

Vero, quamquam per vallem umbrae 
mortis gradiar, malum non timebo: 
nam Tu mecum es; tua virga et tuum 
baculum me consolabuntur. 

Mensam ante me contra eos paras 
qui mihi molestes sunt : meum caput 
cum olivo ungis, et meus poculus plenus 
erit. 

Certe tua misericordia et dementia 
me omnes dies meae vitae sequentur et 
domi Domini perpetuo habitabo. 

Marion Treglown 



THE PILGRIM 



61 



CLUB NEWS 



LATIN CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor — Miss Wilber 

Founded 1938 30 members 

OFFICERS 
President: Joan Beever 

Vice-President: Robert Lowry 

Secretary: Dorothy Morton 

Treasurer: Edgar Mongan 

Those who are particularly interested 
in the study of Latin belong to Lati 
Clavi. The club offers friendly compan- 
ionship and at the same time develops 
a greater interest in the language. 
Activities 

The group meets once a month at the 
school, or, more often, at the home of a 
member where a program planned for 
the occasion is enjoyed. 

The Double L Dance was sponsored 
by the Latin Club and Library Club. 
The net proceeds were divided equally 
between the clubs to be used for pur- 
chasing books needed by both groups. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Teacher Sponsor — Miss Carey 

Founded 1929 21 members 

(March, 1939) 

OFFICERS 

President: NAHUM Morse 

Vice-President: Emily McEwen 

Secretary FRANCES BROWN 

Membership in this society bestows 

the highest honor that can be given to 

a student in our school. The members 



are chosen on a class percentage basis 
by vote of the faculty. Each year in 
March, twelve per cent of the Senior 
class and five per cent of the Junior 
class are elected, while another five per- 
cent of the Senior class become eligible 
in June. To be considered, a student 
must be in the upper fourth of his class 
sCholastically. Scholastic standing, how- 
ever, plays only a part in the selection 
of members. Service and cooperation in 
school activities, demonstration of 
leadership, and a fine moral character 
are important factors in the selection. 

Activities 
The members of the society are striv- 
ing to build a larger and finer college 
catalogue library in the high school 
office. In each catalogue the scholarships 
offered to high school students are to be 
listed. The enlarged library should 
prove of service to those pupils who in- 
tend to continue their education beyond 
high school. 

This year the society is sponsoring 
three Senior Get-Togethers, the music 
to be furnished by Richard Lanman. 

On April 10th an initiation quite dif- 
ferent from the public ceremony was 
held in Room 10. 

The last activity of the school year 
will be the annual picnic planned for 
some time in June. 




LATIN CLUB OFFICERS 

Joan Beever, Robert Lowry (in back), Miss Wilber, Dorothy Morton, and 
Edgar Mongan (in back) 



62 



THE PILGRIM 




HONOR SOCIETY 

First Row: Ita Mm-phy, Constance Addyman, Fi-ances Brown, Secretary; 

Nahum Morse, President; Emily McEwen, Vice-President; Charlotte 

Whiting, Rita Riedel 
Second Row: Joan Beever, Jane Holmes, Lewis Morton, John Brewer, 

Madeline Baker, Lois Chandler, Paul Douglas 
Third Row: Eleanor Fascioli, Brooks Barnes, Barbara Harlow, Robert 

Briggs, Linda Longinotti, Alphonse Gambini, Miss Doris Carey, faculty 

advisor 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

First Row: Barbara Rogers, Betsy Drew, Madeline Baker, Bernard Boudrot, 
Brooks Barnes, Mr. Shipman, Robert Briggs, Betty Coleman, Constance 
Addyman, Tillie Bussolari 

Second Row: Frances Brown, Betty Whiting, Laura Paoletti, Eleanor Hall, 
Barbara Kritzmacher, Miss Rafter, Miss Boucher, Marion Treglown, 
Margaret DeCost, Mary Creati, Ita Murphy, Agnes Barlow 

Third Row: David Furtado, Theodore Lodi, Stanley Cook, Dean Stevens, 
Allen Burgess, Mr. Bagnall, Edward Maccaferri, Solomon Shwom, Al- 
phonse Gambini, Frank Ingenito 

Fourth Row: Joseph Lamborghini, Idore Benati, Harold Rogers, John 
Brewer, William Goodwin, Nahum Morse, Alton Zaniboni, Richard Tubbs, 
Robert Lowry 



THE PILGRIM 



63 



STUDENT 
ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

Teacher Sponsor — Miss Rafter 

Founded : 1933 42 members 

OFFICERS 

President: Brooks Barnes 

Vice-President: Robert Briggs 

Secretary: Bernard Boudrot 

The S. A. S. is a representative or- 
ganization of the student body in Plym- 
outh High School, which seeks to en- 
courage and co-ordinate activities both 
new and old within the school. 
Activities 

Every year the S. A. S. sponsors a 
certain number of assembly programs. 
This year the society voted to have the 
Pitt Parker series. Pitt Parker himself 
was a clever and witty cartoonist whose 
caricatures and excellent portraits de- 
lighted his audience. Russell T. Nev- 
ille told of exploring many of the most 
famous caverns in North America, as 
well as many heretofore unexplored 
caves. Jack Raymon won the interest of 
the students by his handling of the rep- 
tiles which he had brought with him. 
Mr. Raymon emphasized the fact that 
our fear of most snakes is ungrounded, 
whether they are poisonous or not. 
George Pearson brought to life some of 
the characters of Dickens and Shake- 
speare. His appropriate costumes and 
facility of facial and vocal expression 
made the audience feel the presence of 
every character which Mr. Pearson por- 
trayed. 

An important activity undertaken by 
the S. A. S. this year was the installa- 
tion of a banking system under the able 
supervision of Miss Kelly, a faculty 
member. The students cooperated im- 
mediately when the plan for saving 
money for graduation expenses was 
presented for their approval. Each 
Wednesday morning the thrifty stud- 
ents deposit their money at the booth 
nearest their home room. On the first 
day one hundred and thirty-nine pupils 
secured bank books, and today the aver- 
age weekly savings are between fifty- 
five and sixty-five dollars. 

The S. A. S., with the cooperation of 
the Athletic Association, provided the 
girl and boy cheerleaders with new uni- 
forms. The material was donated by 
Mr. Philip Barnes, while the skirts and 
trousers were made at very low cost by 
Mrs. James Longhi and Miss Katherine 
Bregoli. Even the cost of the final pres- 
sing was contributed by Mr. John 
Ottino. We appreciate the interest of 



those who assisted us in this project. 

The second annual Christmas Seal 
Drive was definitely a success. The pur- 
chases by students alone, exceeded those 
of last year. The device for stimulating 
sales obviously had the desired effect, 
for in every room there appeared a large 
reproduction of the seal, and under it a 
bit of appropriate poetry. 

Under the supervision of Miss Viola 
Boucher of the Household Arts Depart- 
ment, the S. A. S. assumed the leader- 
ship in the appeal for donations to the 
Jordan Hospital at Thanksgiving time. 
The number of contributions was en- 
couraging. 

This year the S. A. S. is striving to 
purchase scenery for the stage. With 
the able and willing cooperation of the 
art and woodworking departments, the 
society is certain of success before th° 
end of this school year. The framework 
for the flats is to be made by the wood- 
working department, under the super- 
vision of Mr. Deane Eldridge. The flats, 
themselves, are to be painted under the 
supervision of Miss Virginia Dowling 
in the art department. 



4-H HOSTESS CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor — Miss Boucher 
Founded 1938 14 Members 

OFFICERS 
President: Dorothy Magee 

Vice-President: Lillian Coggeshall 
Secretary: Euphemia Gascoyne 

Program Chairman: 

Theodora Malaguti 

The membership of this group, one of 
our newest clubs organized as recently 
as December, 1938, consists of girls sin- 
cerely interested in becoming well- 
trained, accomplished hostesses. The 
aim of each girl is to be polite, at ease, 
and, above all, tactful. Moreover, she 
wishes to be able to plan and serve an 
appetizing meal. 

Activities 

The main project of the year will be 
a tea served by the model hostesses. 

The club has had Mrs. Alice White, 
County 4-H chairman, and Miss Tina 
Bishop, State Chairman, as speakers. 

In January, the club sponsored a 
friendly get-together, a gathering of 
the members of neighboring 4-H clubs 
and students of Plymouth High who 
wished to attend. The guest of honor at 
this meeting was Mr. Lyle Ring, whose 
wide experience in leading folk dancing 
groups and community sings was ap- 
preciated. 

The 4-H Hostess Club participated in 



64 



THE PILGRIM 



a contest to choose members to attend a 
Poultry Congress in Cleveland, Ohio, to 
be held the last of July. A group from 
each state in the union is to attend. 

On April 4th the Plymouth County 
demonstration was held in Plymouth 
High School with 4-H girls from Mid- 
dleboro, Halifax, and Plymouth com- 
peting. Mary Ryan and Euphemia Gas- 
coyne from the Plymouth club won in 
this competition. These two girls then 
attended the demonstration in Amherst 
in which all the counties of Massachu- 



setts competed. Here the girls from Ply- 
mouth received a ribbon award. 

On June 8th comes 4-H Night as a cli- 
max to the year's activities. At this 
time numerous badges and awards are 
given to members who have completed 
certain phases of 4-H work, and an exhi- 
bition is held to show what has been ac- 
complished. 

We expect that the Hostess Club will 
play an increasingly important part in 
school activities. 




4-H CLUB FOR GIRLS 

First Row: Barbara Coggeshall, Dorothy Magee, Euphemia Gascoyne, 
Theodora Malaguti 

Second Row: Doris Chadwick, Lillian Coggeshall, Miss Boucher, Betty How- 
land, Dorris Bliss 

Third Row: Dorothy Raymond, Margaret Brenner, Mai-y Ryan, Harriet 
Childs, Barbara Sullivan 



INTERNATIONAL 
CORRESPONDENCE CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor — Miss JACQUES 
Founded 1932 75 members 

OFFICERS 
President: Richard Tubbs 

Vice-President: Robert Tedeschi 

Secretary-Treasurer Madeline Baker 
The International Correspondence 
Club has the largest membership of any 
club in Plymouth High School. Its aim is 
to encourage correspondence with stud- 
ents in foreign lands, and, at this time 
of strife among nations, the friendly in- 
ternational relationship instilled by an 
understanding reached through personal 
correspondence proves of value. 
Activities 
At each regular meeting a program is 
planned when speakers from foreign 
countries or students in costume tell of 



other lands and read letters received 
from foreign countries by club members. 

Each year the I. C. C. sponsors an 
assembly program, and this year the 
club presented to us Professor Antone 
de Haas of Harvard University. Pro- 
fessor de Haas told of the political and 
economic condition of each nation in- 
volved in the war scares of today. His 
interesting comparisons and impres- 
sions of modern Germany delighted his 
audience. He concluded his talk by saying 
that the world would not be safe for the 
United States until it is safe for every 
decent, law-abiding nation in the world. 

It was through the club's own stren- 
uous efforts that the entire student body 
was able to hear Professor de Haas, and 
the school is grateful to the I. C. C. for 
arranging such a fine assembly pro- 
gram. 



THE PILGRIM 



65 




CORRESPONDENCE CLUB OFFICERS 

Robert Tedeschi, Vice-President; Richard Tubbs, President; Madeline 
Baker, Secretary 



4-H FORESTRY CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor— Mr. Smiley 

Founded 1936 12 members 

OFFICERS 
President: VERNON KiRKEY 

Vice-President: John Cadorette 

Secretary: Charles Anderson 

Treasurer: Robert Cadorette 

The Forestry Club was formed to de- 
velop an interest in forest conservation 
and woodcraft. As the boys go on camp- 
ing trips and enjoy the recreation and 
companionship that such expeditions 
afford, they learn the principles of safe 
and efficient camping and the import- 
ance of forest conservation. 
Activities 

The 4-H Forestry Club convenes once 
a month with the older members of the 
state club in Plymouth County, Plym- 
outh taking an active part in these 
meetings. 

During the Christmas season the boys 
made many attractive evergreen center- 
pieces for table decorations. 

The annual Tent Caterpillar Exter- 
mination Campaign, held each spring, 
is one of the most important activities 
in the club program. The Plymouth 
club promotes a contest in the grammar 
schools, and the intensive campaigning 
for such a worthy cause proves of great 
interest to townsfolk. 

This year the members of the club 
have a special interest in the newly- 
formed 4-H Hostess Club. Although 
under separate supervision, the two 
groups combine to carry out activities 



important to both organizations. 

The boys are glad to have the oppor- 
tunity to send two club members to a 
conservation camp in western Massa- 
chusetts each summer. 



RADIO CLUB 



Teacher Sponsor — Mr. Packard 

Founded 1935 17 members 

OFFICERS 
President: John Cadorette 

Vice-Presedint STANLEY COOK 

Secretary: Edgar Mongan 

Treasurer: Robert Schofield 

The Radio Club consists of high 
school students who wish to study the 
practical as well as the theoretical 
problems of radio. Under the most 
friendly and informal circumstances, 
the pupils learn to construct simple, yet 
delicate and accurate, receivers and 
transmitters. 

Activities 

This year the members have con- 
structed an extremely sensitive receiv- 
ing set. The antenna is located in the 
attic of the school, and is fed by a low- 
loss cable which makes good reception 
possible. 

The boys are working to procure 
their short-wave radio operator's license 
in order to transmit under their own 
call letters, W1KMU. 

The members of the club felt well re- 
oaid for their interesting work when 
they succeeded in tuning in clearly on 
many foreign stations on the 20 meter 
band. 



66 



THE PILGRIM 




4-H FORESTRY CLUB 
First Row: Mr. Smiley, Vernon Kirkey, John Cadorette, Charles Anderson, 

Robert Cadorette 
Second Row: Allen Burgess, Stanley Roberts, Ernest Condon, Wilfred Magee 




RADIO CLUB 
First Row: Edgar Mongan, John Cadorette, Stanley Cook, Robert Scho- 

field, Robert Cadorette 
Second Row: Francis Staas, Wallace MacLean, Lee Roan, Donald Parsons, 

Francis Vivada, Mr. Packard 
Third Row: Alvin Montanari, Walter Mansfield, George Carter, Kay Bumpus 



JUNIOR PRESS CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor — Miss Humphrey 
Founded 1929 17 members 

Any pupil in the Junior class who is 
interested in journalism may belong to 
the Junior Press Club. This organization 
has editors instead of officers : editor-in- 
chief, assembly editor, alumni editor, 
club editor, office editor, business editor, 
personal editor, and two athletic editors. 



They bring in their news to the meet- 
ings held at the beginning of each week, 
and prepare it for publication in three 
local newspapers. 

Activities 

To supplement the experience gained 
by gathering and editing our school 
news, the club visited a newspaper office 
to observe the procedures there. 



THE PILGRIM 



67 



MINOR SPORTS 

BADMINTON is one of the fastest 
growing recreations in America, ac- 
cording to a recent magazine article. It 
has speed and requires physical reserve. 
It appeals to our competitive instinct 
and demands more strategy than phys- 
ique. It is a most adaptable sport, suit- 
ing all degrees of skill, all ages, both 
sexes, and an indoor or outdoor court. 

Last year the girls of Plymouth High 
engaged wholeheartedly in this sport, 
and this year their enthusiasm for it 
has nearly doubled. Classes are now 
scheduled three times a week instead of 
two. At the end of the season tourna- 
ments are planned for those who wish 
to compete, one for the advanced group 
and one for beginners. 

Last year Lois Rovatti and Tillie 
Bussolari became the first badminton 
champions in P. H. S. This year the 
honor was won by the same girls. 

This year, for the first time, bowling 
has become a minor sport in P. H. S. 
The girls started with Wednesday after- 
noon games at the Plymouth Bowling 
Alleys — then the boys followed suit. 

The highest bowling average for the 
season was made by Euphemia Gas- 
coyne. For that matter, a good majority 
of the girls usually bowl between 70 and 
90. 



THE SENIORS HAVE: 

A Baker but no butcher 

Two Barnes but no cows 

A Beever but no dam 

A Coleman but no iceman 

A Douglas but no shoe 

A Goldsmith but no gold 

A Tillie but no toiler 

A Priscilla but no Alden 

A Harty but no hale 

A Kaiser but no Kay 

A Mueller but no spaghetti 

A Schilling but no pound 

A Banker but no money 

A Freeman but no slaveman 

A Hughes but no Howard 

A Hsath but no moor 

A Farina but no cereal 

A Proctor but no Gamble 

A Po but no river 

A Reed but no bulrushes 

A Morse but no Sherman 

A Weston but no Eastern 

A Whiting but no milk 

A Swift but no slow 

A Grant but no Woolworth 



Candidate for the Circus 
A fat man was walking along the 
promenade of a seaside town when he 
noticed a weighing machine with a sign : 
"I speak your weight." 

He stood on the platform and put a 
penny in the slot. To his great embar- 
rassment a voice answered : "One at a 
time, please!" 



















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PRESS CLUB 

First Row: Barbara Kritzmacher, Jeannie Hill, Lois Chandler, Gloria 
Morelli, Lillian Coggeshall 

Second Row: Elizabeth Johnson, Dorris Bliss, Enis Capozucca, Miss Hum- 
phrey, Phyllis Goldstein, Barbara Harlow 

Third Row: Charles Anti, Lillian Hall, Virginia Sampson, Helen Hamilton, 
Bruna Pizzotti, Milton Penn 



68 



THE PILGRIM 





Ups and Downs 

The deep-sea diver was hard at work 
on the ocean bottom. 

Suddenly an urgent voice came over 
his telephone, which connected him with 
the boat above. 

"Come up quickly," the voice said, 
"the Captain tells me the boat is sink- 
ing." (Montreal Herald) 

A Worker 

His room-mate had gone to the mov- 
ies, so the college freshman left this 
note: 

"If I'm studying when you get back, 
wake me up!" (Montreal Star) 

"There's only one guy who is always 
up to his chin in music." 

"Who's he?" 

"The violinist." (Hartford Courant) 




OUR FOOTBALL 

ME.RO OOE1 

FWMNA\! 



AIN'T HE . 
TtOCUTElf 



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Mixed Fare 

Diner — "Waiter! This stew is terrible. 
What kind is it?" 

Waiter — "The chef calls this his enthu- 
siastic stew." 

Diner— "Why?" 

Waiter — "He puts everything he has in- 
to it." (Atlanta Constitution) 

Spell of Weather 
Teacher — "Willie, spell weather." 
Willie— "W-i-e-t-h-o-u-r." 
Teacher — "S{it down, boy; that's the 
worst spell of weather we've had this 
year." (Safe Driver) 

Money's Worth 
Scotchman (at riding academy) — "I 

wish to rent a horse." 
Groom — "How long?" 
Scotchman — "The longest you've got: 
there be five of us going." 

(American Boy) 




THE PILGRIM 



69 




Bright Face of Danger 
Big-Game Hunter — "Oh, yes, I've been 
nearly eaten by lions many times, but 
life without a little risk would be very 
tame." 
Little Man — "I agree ! Many times when 
the weather has seemed doubtful, I 
have deliberately gone without my 
umbrella." (Toronto Globe) 

An Old One 
Sandy entered the shop where he had 
recently purchased a bicycle. 

"It's about the bike, mon," he said. 
Hasn't it arrived yet?" said the shop- 
keeper. 

It has," said Sandy, "but where's that 
free wheel you spoke about?" 

(Hartford Courant) 

Heads 
"There must be a lot of golfers in 
your office building." 

"What makes you think so?" 
"Well, I called out 'four' in the elev- 
ator and everybody ducked!" 

(American Observer) 

Dog's All Right 

A dog-lover had presented a puppy to 
a friend who called up in a few days, 
all distress and excitement. 

"Oh," she wailed, "Skippy has chewed 
off the corner of our best Oriental rug. 
What shall I do?" 

"Never mind," answered the dog-lov- 
er, soothingly. "If it's real Oriental, the 
colors won't harm him." 

(Minneapolis Journal) 

Natural History 

"Teacher says," said little Johnny, 
fishing an ant out of his lemonade, 
"that ants are the most industrious crea- 
tures in the world." 

"So they are, dear," replied mother. 

Johnny shook his head. "I don't be- 
lieve it," he retorted. "If they are, how 



is it that they find time to attend all 
our picnics?" (The Messenger) 

Results Assured 
"Can you tell me how to wash spinach 
so as to get all the sand off it?" 

"Sure. Tie it on the end of a fishing- 
pole and hold it under Niagara Falls." 

(Tit-Bits) 
Bright Student 
Teacher — "Can anyone tell me whaft 
causes trees flo become petrified?" 
Bright student — "The wind makes them 
rock." (Worcester Gazette) 

Bright Lad 
Teacher — "Can you tell me what Aust- 
ralia is bounded by, Freddie?" 
Freddie — "Kangaroos, sir." 

(The Messenger) 
Stop Quibbling 
Butcher Pryce — "Round steak, Mad- 
am?" 
Mrs. Noowedd — "The shape doesn't mat- 
ter, just so it's tender." 

(Worcester Telegram) 
Covering Question! 
"How old are you, sonny?" asked the 
inquisitive old man of the little boy on 
the beach. 

"Six," came the reply. 
"Six," echoed the old man, "and you 
are not as tall as my umbrella." 

The boy drew himself up to his full 
height. "How old is your umbrella?" he 
asked. (London News) 



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70 



THE PILGRIM 




AVIATION CLUB 

First Row: Allan Wall, William Goodwin, Bradford Smith, George Banker 

Second Row: Harley Mitchell, Errington Brown, Alden Mitchell, Mr. Packard 

Third Row: Gerald Ziegengeist, Donald Parsons, Charles Butterfield, Howard 

Beever, Norman Longhi 



AVIATION CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor — Mr. Packard 
Founded 1936 20 members 

OFFICERS 
President: Willliam Goodwin 

Vice-President: Allen Wall 

Secretary-Treasurer : Bradford Smith 
This club was formed to give those 
pupils who are sincerely interested in 
aviation, the opportunity to learn its 
principles and possibilities from ex- 
perts in that field. 

Activities 

During the year the members of the 
club are addressed by local pilots or per- 
sons outside school who are interested 
in aviation. In April, Dr. Francis 
LeBaron gave a lecture on private fly- 
ing. At a later date, he plans to show 
the group moving pictures taken from 
his plane. 

An event to which members look for- 
ward with eager anticipation, is the 
showing of moving pictures of the 
National Air Races. 



UNDECIDED 

If the girls were sorted out 

By the color of their hair, 
Boys would know without a doubt 

What to think of dark or fair. 

Would they like them dark as night, 
Or would they like a carrot red, 

Brown or mouse or golden bright — 
Just what would be their chosen head? 

They might like a curly top, 

Boyish bob or just a mop; 
But when it comes to up or down, 

The boys will either smile or frown. 

But whether hair be up or down, 
Or light or black or red or brown, 

The main thing's not what's on the head, 
But that which is inside instead. 

Errington Brown '41 







Key to Devinez 






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I Ask You 
Tourist — (pointing to over head elec- 
tric fan) — "Hey, steward, if I have 
this propeller stopped, will it make 
any difference to the speed of the 
ship?" (Atlantic Constitution) 

Quid Pro Quo 
Schoolboy (entering his father's study) : 
"Dad, I have finished your income 
tax assessment. How are you getting 
on with my homework?" (Humorist) 
Didn't Attend 
Teacher — "Tell me, Johnny, what do you 

know about the Caucasian race?" 
Johnny — "I don't know anything about 
it ; I wasn't there." 

(Telephone Topics) 



THE PILGRIM 



71 





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PILGRIM STAFF 

First Row: Lewis Morton, Alphonse Gambini, Brooks Barnes, Nahum Morse, 
Richard Tubbs, Elizabeth Coleman, Madeline Baker 

Second Row: Constance Addyman, Ita Murphy, Frances Brown, Lydia 
Brewster, Emily McEwen, Linda Longinotti, Virginia Weston, Eleanor 
Fascioli, Shirley Goldsmith, Rita Riedel 

Third Row: Catherine Leonardi, Lois Chandler, Walter Corrow, Paul Doug- 
las, Edgar Mongan, Alton Zaniboni, Robert Briggs, Joan Beever, Dorris 
Bliss 




SENIOR SPEAKING CHOIR 

First Row: Shirley Goldsmith, Joan Beever, Mildred Govoni, Catherine 
Leonardi, Jennie Giori, Dallas Carpenter, Clara Pinto, Katherine Baratta, 
Antonette Rossetti, Mary Fernandes, Constance Addyman, Doris Ruprecht 

Second Row: Alberta Pederzani, Martha Vickery, Miriam Ketchen, Helen 
Swift, Laura MacLean, Maralyn Pascoe, Eleanor Fascioli, Dorothy 
Correa, Eunice Santos, Rita Riedel, Gladys Mueller 

Third Row: Ita Murphy, Emily McEwen, Madeline Baker, Gerald Ziegen- 
geist, Robert Pratt, Richard Tubbs, Phyllis Reinhardt, Ruth Holtz, Janie 
Christie 



72 



THE PILGRIM 



An in graphs 




THE PILGRIM 



73 



AutflgrapfjB 



(UlaBH of 1930 



74 



THE PILGRIM 



Compliments of 

DANFORTH'S 

"Where Quality Prevails" 



Plymouth Rock 
Hardware Co. 



62 Court St. 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Telephone 950 



STYLE Plus QUALITY 

Two Very Important Words in Our 
NEW LINE OF SPORT CLOTHES FOR SUMMER 

WASH SLACKS— SPORT SHIRTS- 
SWEATERS— NOVELTY HOSE 

In Our New Style Line You Will Find Something Different 
Agents for BOSTONIAN SHOES 



MORSE & SHERMAN 



WM. J. SHARKEY 



COURT STREET 



PLYMOUTH 



Bailey Motor Sales, Inc. 

Tel. 1090 
114 SANDWICH STREET PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Buick and Pontiac Sales and Service 
G. M. C. Truck Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade . . . One of the best equipped Service Stations 
in this vicinity . . . 24-hour service . . . Open day and night . . . 

Agents for Exide Batteries. 

DON'T FORGET— All of our REPAIR WORK is GUARANTEED 

A fine selection of 

USED CARS AND TRUCKS 

to choose from at all times. 



THE PILGRIM 



75 



! 

| CURRIER'S 


Helen's Beauty Shop 


1 Restaurant and Ice Cream Shop 


BEAUTY CULTURE 


| Local Dealer for 


In All Its Branches 


j Whitman and Kemp Products 


19 Court Street 


= 63 Main St. Plymouth, Mass. 


Tel. 213-M 


j WHITNEY SHIRTS 


MALLORY HATS 


j PLYMOUTH 


MEN'S SHOP 



WM. CAVICCHI, Prop. 
18 Main Street 

LOW OVERHEAD — REASONABLE PRICES 
Inquire about Our Special Offer on Suits for Graduates 



Tel. 341 



ill U 



CONGRESS SPORTSWEAR 



CHARACTER CLOTHES 



Compliments of 
J. F. TAYLOR 

DENTIST 



Compliments of 

NATIONAL "D" STORE 

27 Summer St. 

J. S. COHEN, Proprietor 



Relief for ACID STOMACH 

BISMA-REX 

Four Action Antacid Powder 
Neutralizes Acidity — Removes Gas — 
Soothes Stomach — Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50c 

SAVE with SAFETY at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY 
BEMIS DRUG COMPANY 

"The 6 Busy REXALL Stores" 
Abington — N. Abington — Rockland 

"In Plymouth It's Cooper's" 



FRANKLIN AUTO SUPPLY CO. 



Compliments of 



DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN J 



BENJAMIN D. LORING 

DIAMONDS— WATCHES— JEWELRY 

SILVERWARE 

GIFTS AND CLOCKS 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



28 Main St. 



Plymouth, Mass. 



76 THE PILGRIM 



i 



Northeastern 
University 




College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the 
understanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. 
The purpose of this program is to give the student a liberal and cultural edu- 
cation and a vocational competence which fits him to enter some specific type 
of useful employment. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles 
of business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING AND FINANCE, 
or BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. Modern methods of instruction, including 
lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, professional talks by 
business executives, and motion pictures of manufacturing processes are used. 

College of Engineering 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses 
in the fields of CIVIL. MECHANICAL (with DIESEL. AERONAUTICAL, 
and AIR CONDITIONING options), ELECTRICAL. CHEMICAL, INDUS- 
TRIAL ENGINEERING, and ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION. General 
engineering courses are pursued during the freshman year; thus the student 
need not make a final decision as to the branch of engineering in which he 
wishes to specialize until the beginning of the sophomore year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperclassmen in all courses, 
provides for a combination of practical industrial experience with classroom in- 
struction. Under this plan the student is able to earn a portion of his school 
expenses as well as to make business contacts which prove valuable in later 
years. 

Degrees Awarded 

Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science 

Pre-legal Programs Available 



FOR CATALOG— MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 

Northeastern University 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog of the 

I I College of Liberal Arts I I Pre-Legal Program 

r~| College of Business Administration 
I I College of Engineering 

Name ■■•• 

Address 



H-84 



THE PILGRIM 77 



| THE MUTUAL SAVINGS 
! BANKS OF PLYMOUTH 

ARE 
| DEPOSITORIES FOR 

j 569 

! SCHOOL SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



PLYMOUTH FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK 



PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 






*' STABlilTY **' 



MUTUAL SAVINGS CENTRAL FUND 



i 



78 



THE PILGRIM 



FIRST NATIONAL STORES 



25 Main Street, Plymouth 



0. R. SAYRE 



W. G. WOOD 



C. PAUL 

For Your 

SHOES AND REPAIRING 
Honest Values, Dependable Service 



53 Court St. 



PLYMOUTH 



MITCHELL-TZrIOMAS CO., Inc. 



HOME FURNISHINGS 



! 66 Court Street 



Plymouth, Mass. 



PLYMOUTH MOTOR SALES 



f 

( MERCURY 



AUTHORIZED 

FORD 



LINCOLN-ZEPHYR 



Ask for Demonstrations 



f 

I 181 Court Street 

1 

I 



Tel. 1247-W 



THE PILGRIM 



79 



DUTTON MOTOR CAR Co. 

115 Sandwich St. 
OLDSMOBILE 



CADILLAC 



LA SALLE 



Tel. 1500-W 



SALES 



SERVICE 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE SPECIALTIES 

Birdseye Frosted Foods 

1 Warren Ave. Tel. 1298-W 

The Store of Values 

HCYTCD'C SHOE 

ULL/S. 1 JDK 3 STORE 

STYLES AND QUALITY 

39 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Telephone 183-W 



W. N. SNOW & SON 
FURNITURE 

Window Shades Venetian Blinds 

LINOLEUM 
9 Town Square Plymouth 134-M 



SILVIO LEONARDI 



PIONEER FOOD STORE 



289 Court St. 



Plymouth 



Telephone 53 



PETROLEUM SALES and SERVICE, Inc. 

Agents for 

THE ATLANTIC REFINING CO. 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 

Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 

HEDGE ROAD, PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone, Plymouth 1499 



80 THE PILGRIM 



• 



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i 
I 

BOTH THE HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



IT HAS BEEN OUR GREAT PLEASURE TO SERVE 



DURING THE SCHOOL YEARS FROM 1929 TO 1939 



LAHEY ICE CREAM CO. 



10 Nelson Street, Plymouth Tel. 160 



Let's Dance 
To the Tune of 



Better business! Let's get into the swing of things! Let's take advantage 
of the Big Buying Surge! Let's advertise — and advertise — and adver- 
tise! A barrage of well printed advertising, sent to your best prospects 
and customers, will bring you more business than you've had in a long 
time! Your merchandise — plus our paper and ink and presses — can 
really go places! Phone 165-M. 



The Rogers Print 

Producers of Preferred Printing 
20 Middle Street Plymouth, Mass. 



THE PILGRIM 



81 



„.* 



MILLAR COAL AND OIL COMPANY 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



READING 



ANTHRACITE 



N. E. COKE 



NEW RIVER 
BITUMINOUS 



RANGE 81 
FUEL OILS 



Join us at 



HOWARD JOHNSON'S 

Plymouth Shop 



(OPEN EVENINGS) 



BANDER'S 



PLYMOUTH'S MOST POPULAR 

WOMEN'S SHOP 

54 Main St. Tel. 38 Plymouth 



Congratulatioyis to the 
SENIOR CLASS 

rtfirilla iHat& 

Hand Weavers 



82 



THE PILGRIM 



Compliments of 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



Town Brook Service Station 



LUBRICATION 



Repairing 24 Hour Service 



Tel. 820-W 



D. E. REID 

Wholesale Confectionery 

Paper Specialties 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE 

Phone 1134-M 17 Alvin Road 



PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 
STREET RAILWAY CO. 

RIDE OUR 
MODERN AIR CONDITIONED BUSES 



Sandwich St. 



Plymouth 



BELL SHOP 



Hosiery, Underwear, Corsetry 



12 Court St. 



Plymouth 



Compliments of 



SHERMAN'S 



PLYMOUTH 



NO. PLYMOUTH 



THE PILGRIM 



83 



PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 



Plymouth, Mass. 



BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 



Tel. 237 



EDDIE'S SHOE SYSTEM 

18 Main St. 
Enna-Jettick Shoe Store 



W. R. Davis 



H. S. Hatch 



Davis 8C Morgan Electric Co. 

Electrical Problems 

Honestly Solved 

DEPENDABLE WIRING 

Plymouth Since 1919 Tel. 290 



CENTRAL SHOE REPAIR 

E. CANDUCCI, Proprietor 

Expert Shoe Repairing 
SHOES SH1NED 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
37 Main St. Plymouth 

MARTHA'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Hair cutting, Manicuring, Shampoo, 

Marcelling, Eyebrow Arching, Facials, 

Machineless Permanents, 

Machine Eugene Permanents 

3 Whiting St. Tel. 1282 



PIAZZI THE FLORIST 



Flowers For All Occasions 



4 Cordage Terrace Ext. 



Tel. 1518 



84 



THE PILGRIM 



BEST WISHES FOR SUCCESS 



AFTER GRADUATION 



FROM 



BUTTNER'S 



BEAUTY CULTURE 

The Ideal Profession 

WILFRED ACADEMY 



The Ideal School 

An entire building is devoted to spacious 
classrooms and lecture halls for practical 
training in every phase of the ai'ts and 
sciences of Beauty Culture. 

Wilfred has equipped this unique train- 
ing center with the most complete and 
most modern facilities available. Wilfred 
maintains a staff of capable master-in- 
structors to supervise your training and 
to give you individual attention during 
your training period. And after gradua- 
tion, we offer a perpetual Free Place- 
ment Service. 




Beauty Culture is an ideal proiession — Wil- 
fred is the ideal school. For comprehensive 
infrrmation visit us or write for illustrated 
Booklet E24. 



WILFRED ACADEMY 



492 Boylston Street, 



of Hair and Beauty Culture 
Boston, Mass. 



Kenmore 0880 



THE PILGRIM 



85 



tJ/te PPfAon C/c/tooi 

Prepares students for career positions as 
Medical Laboratory Technologists, X-ray 
Technicians, Physiotherapists, and Secre- 
taries to Doctors. 

Co-educational day and evening classes. 
Limited enrollment. Free placement. 
Write for catalog. 

THE WILSON SCHOOL 



285 Huntington Ave. 



Boston, Mass. 



We hope that you will 
do unto Our Advertisers 
as they have done by us. 



S ADO HI'S 

"Fashion Center" 



Shows the NEWEST in Misses and Women's Wear at Moderate Prices 



Compliments of 
PLYMOUTH PHARMACY 

PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

PLUMBING, HEATING 

PAINT AND HARDWARE SUPPLIES 

39 Court St. Tel. 1423 



Compliments of 
GRAY THE CLEANER 

GAMBINFS 

LUNCHEONETTE 

Air Conditioned 





BORZAN 


BEAUTY 


SALON 






Permanents 






#3.50 






End Permanents 




. 


. #2.50 






Machineless Permanents 


. 


#5.00 






Machineless End 


s 




#3.00 




Hair 


Cuts, Finger Waves, 


Manicure, 


Eyebrows and Hair Trimming 






Priced at 


35c 








MISSES BORSARI 


AND 


ZANDI 




20 North 


Spooner Street 






North 


Plymouth 


■ ■■ || ■■ ii ■■ ^^ 




Call MISS ZANDI 







86 



THE PILGRIM 



JOSEPH J. WOOD 

Successor to Anthony Atwood 

Dealer in 
FRESH, SALTED and PICKLED FISH 
Scallops, Lobsters, Oysters and Clams 

Telephone 261—262 



KAY'S CUT-RATE 

21 Main Street 
PATENT MEDICINES, COSMETICS 

Lowest Prices in Town 



Compliments of 


Telephone 1187-W 

JIM'S LUNCH &C RESTAURANT 


EARL W. GOODING 


Regular Dinners A La Carte Service 


Jeweler and Optometrist 


Shore Dinners Our Specialty 

5 and 7 Main Street PLYMOUTH 


When there is better work done, 
we will do it. 


ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 


GOVTS TAILOR SHOP 


BEAUTY SHOP 


Telephone 662 
Main Street PLYMOUTH 


Room 10 Buttner Building 
Plymouth, Mass. 



For The GRADUATION GIFT 

Give a Fine Watch or Ring 

We carry a complete line of Nationally Advertised Watches 
Bulova, Benrus, Elgin, Gruen, Hamilton, Waltham and Longines 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings; Sheaffer Pen and Pencil Sets; 

Umbrellas ; Overnight Cases ; Tie and Collar Sets ; Bill Folds ; 

Toilet Sets, 3 pieces to 20 

PAY AS LITTLE AS FIFTY CENTS A WEEK 



;iew^lry\ /company 



Visit Our 

OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

DR. E. P. JEWETT, Reg. Optometrist 

in charge 



THE PILGRIM 



87 



Burdett College 



COURSES FOR 
YOUNG MEN 
AND WOMEN 

Business Administration- 
Accounting, Executive's As- 
sistant (for men), Executive 
Secretarial, Stenographic 
Secretarial, Shorthand, Type- 
writing, Bookkeeping, and 
Finishing Courses. 

One- and Two-Year Programs. 
Previous commercial training 
not required for entrance. 
Leading colleges represented 
in attendance. Students 
from different states. Place- 
ment service free to gradu- 
ates. Visitors welcome. 



& 



61 



ST YEAR BEGINS 
SEPTEMBER, 1939 



udmeii 



v, 



raimn 



% 



As an institution. Burdett College is now an 
acknowledged leader in the field in which its 
work is done. Statesmen, financiers, bank officials, 
presidents, vice-presidents, treasurers, and many 
others holding important business positions are 
numbered among its alumni. Yet its pride as an 
institution rests not alone upon the achievements 
of the illustrious, but upon the accomplishments 
of that large number of men and women who, 
because of the practical nature of the training 
received, now hold respon- . 

sible positions in various 
lines of business in many 
states. 



mSMMMSM 




Write or telephone for Day or Evening Catalogue 



156 STUART STREET. BOSTON 



HANcoek 6300 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 114 Years 

PAINTS, HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 

PLUMBING, HEATING; SHEET METAL WORK 

1 Main Street, Plymouth 

Tel. 283 



GRADUATES 

You'll want to look your best when you step up to receive your diploma, 
at that great event — Graduation. 

WE HAVE THE SUITS, TIES, SHIRTS, AND SHOES THAT WILL GIVE YOU THE 

WELL-DRESSED APPEARANCE THAT YOU DESIRE. VISIT OUR STORE 

AND LET US ASSIST YOU IN MAKING YOUR SELECTIONS 

Exclusive Distributors of the PRISCILLA HAND-LOOM TIE Adopted by the 

Class of '39 

PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

"Home of Dependability" 



56 MAIN STREET 



Tel. 730-731 



PLYMOUTH 



88 THE PILGRIM 



Sight Is Priceless - 

Light Is Cheap 



Protect 

Your Most 

Precious Possession 

With 

I. E. S. LAMPS 



THE PILGRIM 



89 



Does Your Boy Drink Milk? 




Ci. 



Nook 



Farm 

Dairy 

is my 

milkman. 



I'm only 8 years old and am one of the healthiest boys in 
my class. That's why I am thankful to NOOK FARM 
DAIRY. My mother says that Nook Farm Products are 
always fresh and always best " 



Nook Farm Dairy 


Robert A Carr 
Business Manager 


''''Country Fresh"*"* 

Eldon J. Dahl 
Sales Manager 


NOOK ROAD 


Tel. 1262 PLYMOUTH 



90 



THE PILGRIM 



Compliments of 



DR. HIRSON 



MAYFLOWER CLEANERS 

KOBLANTZ BROS. 
First Class Tailoring 



VOLTA OIL COMPANY 

Distributor of 

Texaco Petroleum Products 

No. Plymouth Tel. 840 



Compliments of 
EDYTHE'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 
16 Main St. Plymouth 



THE VIOLIN SHOP 

ROGER S. KELLEN 

Dealer in 

Old V'o'ins, Violas, and Cellos 

Large Assortment of Cases, Bows, 

Strings, etc. 

Artistic Repairing A Specialty 

9 Winslow St. Tel. 1420 Plymouth, Mass. 



CONVENIENT, ECONOMICAL 

LAUNDRY SERVICE 

♦ 

OLD COLONY LAUNDRY 

Tel. 272 Howland St. 



Compliments of 




THE PILGRIM 



91 



MATCHLESS 



FOODS 



USED BY LEADING SCHOOLS 
COLLEGES AND INSTITUTIONS 
FOR OVER HALF A CENTURY. 
PRESERVES, JAMS, JELLIES, 
PEANUT BUTTER, MARSHMALLOW. 
A FULL LINE OF CANNED FRUITS, 
VEGETABLES AND CONDIMENTS. 



IT'S QUALITY NEVER EXCELLED 

New England's Leading Manufacturing Wholesale Grocer 

WEBSTER-THOMAS COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS. 



WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 

65 Main Street, Plymouth 



Agents for < 



Walk-Over Shoes 
Bass Moccasins 
Kamp Tramps 
Goodrich Line of 

Sneakers and Rubbers 
Mansfield Shoes 

for Men 



D. W. BESSE, Proprietor 



House 



with 
the 



Blue Blinds 



7 North St., Plymouth 
Tel. 1149 

Breakfast — Dinner — Supper 
Heme Cooked Bread, Cake, and Pastry 

JOHN and CONSTANCE KENNY 



STEVENS THE FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Member of The Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 

9 COURT STREET 



A. CECCARELLI 3c SON 
Tailors 



SUITS MADE-TO-ORDER 

CLEANSING REMODELING 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



310 Court Street 
North Plymouth, Mass. 



Tel. 941 



92 THE PILGRIM 



DONOM & SULLIVAN 



Minium; cinii'nv 



# 




# 



470 BMIC flVfnUE B0SI00, 



Harbor Building Lib. 8711 



♦ 



P. V. 



THE PILGRIM 



93 



Plymouth Co-operative Federal 

Savings and Loan Association 

(Formerly PLYMOUTH CO-OPERATIVE BANK) 
Incorporated 1882 Federalized 1937 



A. PERRY RICHARDS 

President 

ROBERT J. TUBBS 
Vice-Pres. and Treasurer 



WALTER R. AMESBURY 
Vice-President 

WALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Asst. Treas. 




s^iM^ 



Insured SAFETY 



Liberal YEILD 



HOME MORTGAGE LOANS 

THAT FIT YOUR BUDGET 

CALL OR WRITE FOR INFORMATION 



Plymouth Co-operative 
Federal Sayings 






AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Forty-four Main St., 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. 



94 



THE PILGRIM 



LEO'S 

BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOPS 

Plymouth and Duxbury 

Compliments of 
DR. DOUGLAS 



"We put New Life in Old Shoes" 
PLYMOUTH SHOE HOSPITAL 

63'/ 2 Main St. PLYMOUTH 



ZANELLO FURNITURE CO. 

UPHOLSTERING — BEDDING 

Repaired and Made to Order 
84 Court Street Tel. 1485 



PUZZLED 

by Gift 

Problems? 

Take a Tip . . . Take a Trip to 

BURBANKS, Inc. 

19 — 21 Court Street, Plymouth, Mass. 

"THE NATION'S BIRTHPLACE" 











THE PILGRIM 



95 



Fisherman's Equipment Electrical and Plumbing Supplies 

Pumps Paint Headquarters Seeds 

Garden Tools Locksmiths 

Heating and Sheet Metal Work 

BLISS HARDWARE CO., Inc. 

Main Street Ext. Tel. 825 Bliss Building 

Plymouth, Mass. 



FUR STORAGE 

When Summer Rolls Around 
And Moths come out to play 
Your very best Bet Is — 
To store the PURITAN Way 

Our Fur Vault is right 
on our Premises 



CLEANING — TAILORING 

The Puritan Tailoring 
Department Features 

Only One Class of Cleaning 
and Tailoring Work — 

THE BEST 

Send your Clothes to the PURITAN. One 
try and you will never go elsewhere. 



PURITAN CLOTHING COMPANY 



56 Main Street 



TAILORING DEPT. 

JACK OTTINO, Mgr. 
Phone 730 



Plymouth 



MIDDLE ST. GARAGE 



Compliments of 



EDES MANUFACTURING CO. 



Protects That Orange Juice Flavor 

DRINK 

ORANGE 
KIST 

MADE WITH REAL JUICE 

From Tree-Ripened Valencia Oranges 

Rich juice flavor — protected, sealed carbon- 
ation — assurance of freshness, sanitation 
and wholesomeness. 

Choose your favorite in Kist Beverages — 
Strawberry Kist, Lemon Kist, Lime Kist, 
Root Beer Kist, and many others. Ask your 
dealer — look for the Kist Sign on his store. 

Carbonated . . to protect the flavor 

Sealed . . to insure freshness 

i 

Plymouth Bottling Works 

Incorporated 
124 Sandwich St., Plymouth 

Tel. 1623-W 
i 



96 



THE PILGRIM 



laid 



tuiiin 



18 NEWBURY STREET 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
School and College Photographers 




c*. 



Completely equipped to render the highest 

quality craftsmanship and an expedited 

service on both personal portraiture and 

photography for college annuals. 



^ Photographers to the Class of J 939 p 

# Patrons May Obtain Duplicates at Any Time w